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The Best Behavior Management Tools - 2022

Last updated on February 15, 2022

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Our Picks For The Top Behavior Management Tools

Show Contents
Our Take
  Top Pick

‎VNOM Hanging Foldable Pocket Classroom Reward Chart

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval

‎VNOM

Hanging Foldable Pocket Classroom Reward Chart

Overall Take

Positive ReinforcementThis bright, vibrant chart helps keep teachers and students right on track.

  Runner Up

Carson Dellosa Education Classroom Positive Reinforcement Pocket Chart

Carson Dellosa Education

Classroom Positive Reinforcement Pocket Chart

Overall Take

A Real CatchThis chart is pretty versatile, and no matter how you decide to use it, your students will reap the benefits.

  We Also Like

Griffin Phillips & Gully Organizational Behavior

Griffin Phillips & Gully

Organizational Behavior

Overall Take

A Wealth of KnowledgeLearn about how respected managers handle responsibilities and understand how to apply these strategies in your work and professional life.

  Strong Contender

m&h invites Business Card Size Reward Punch Cards, 50-Piece

m&h invites

Business Card Size Reward Punch Cards, 50-Piece

Overall Take

Just Like Restaurants and ShopsKids are drawn to these motivating cards that reward their good behaviors because it's like a game, and they get something for all their hard work.

Guide written by Danielle Smyth
Last updated on February 15, 2022

One of the essential skills that teachers, parents, caregivers and managers need is controlling the behavior of those they are responsible for. The methods vary depending on the setting, ages and other factors, but they can range from a gold star to a cash bonus.

In classrooms, behavior management plans use procedures and tools to hold students accountable for their behavior and reward them. A successful one will have procedures, rules and consequences; you must explain these aspects before implementing them.

When students contribute to the plan’s development, they have a vested interest in succeeding. When you get a behavior chart, cards or another tool, you can give them a few rewards to choose from, or they can help decorate the charts.

Look for materials with bright colors and exciting graphics to hold the attention of participants. Customizable options work exceptionally well. Younger kids appreciate rewards like healthy snacks, cool pencils or other things they can use in class, like a small book.

Giving kids something special for completing their homework without being asked for a week straight can motivate them. These rewards also work in home settings and daycares. You can hang up a chart somewhere everyone in the family will see it, like in the kitchen.

Kids can also help you decide what the reward will be. This is important, because if you choose something that doesn’t appeal to them, they will be more likely to lose interest.

Behavior management in organizations is much more complicated because you are working with adult employees who are harder to control — and harder to reward.

This kind of behavior management is more of a science and is taught in schools, on the job and in seminars. If you need help with the topic, several good books are available for purchase. Most share enlightening examples and provide excellent strategies for incorporating these ideas into your own behaviors.

The Best Behavior Management Tools

1
  Top Pick

‎VNOM Hanging Foldable Pocket Classroom Reward Chart

This unique behavior-reward hanging chart has seven clear pockets and measures 42 3/4 inches by 9 3/4 inches. It includes 14 colorful, customizable cards that you can slide into place. You can then clip on the included clothespins to help kids track progress and receive encouragement for their behavior.

Features


Specifications

Brand
‎VNOM
Model
2
  Runner Up

Carson Dellosa Education Classroom Positive Reinforcement Pocket Chart

Designed for medium- and large-sized classes, Carson Dellosa's 29-by-22-inch hanging chart is made from deep blue fabric and has 30 clear pockets that you can design in different ways. Corral student cell phones and classroom supplies or use the pockets as compliment catchers.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Carson Dellosa Education
Model
3
  We Also Like

Griffin Phillips & Gully Organizational Behavior

Learn the fundamentals of employee behaviors, apply traditional and contemporary management ideas and practice the necessary skills to tackle today's management challenges with this textbook.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Griffin Phillips & Gully
Model
4
  Strong Contender

m&h invites Business Card Size Reward Punch Cards, 50-Piece

This clever behavior management tool borrows the reward punch card idea from restaurants, nail salons and other retail or service industry shops. Each card has 10 numbers to punch out and spots to write the student's name and type of reward.

Features


Specifications

Brand
m&h invites
Model
5
  Also Great

Konopaske Ivancevich & Matteson Organizational Behavior and Management

Written by Robert Konopaske, John Ivancevich and Michael Matteson, "Organizational Behavior & Management" is a standard textbook many universities use, and it has received many teaching awards. It contains detailed cases, group participation exercises and self-learning text.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Konopaske Ivancevich & Matteson
Model

Our Behavior Management Tool Buying Guide

One of the essential skills that teachers, parents, caregivers and managers need is controlling the behavior of those they are responsible for. The methods vary depending on the setting, ages and other factors, but they can range from a gold star to a cash bonus.

In classrooms, behavior management plans use procedures and tools to hold students accountable for their behavior and reward them. A successful one will have procedures, rules and consequences; you must explain these aspects before implementing them.

When students contribute to the plan’s development, they have a vested interest in succeeding. When you get a behavior chart, cards or another tool, you can give them a few rewards to choose from, or they can help decorate the charts.

Look for materials with bright colors and exciting graphics to hold the attention of participants. Customizable options work exceptionally well. Younger kids appreciate rewards like healthy snacks, cool pencils or other things they can use in class, like a small book.

Giving kids something special for completing their homework without being asked for a week straight can motivate them. These rewards also work in home settings and daycares. You can hang up a chart somewhere everyone in the family will see it, like in the kitchen.

Kids can also help you decide what the reward will be. This is important, because if you choose something that doesn’t appeal to them, they will be more likely to lose interest.

Behavior management in organizations is much more complicated because you are working with adult employees who are harder to control — and harder to reward.

This kind of behavior management is more of a science and is taught in schools, on the job and in seminars. If you need help with the topic, several good books are available for purchase. Most share enlightening examples and provide excellent strategies for incorporating these ideas into your own behaviors.

DWYM Fun Fact

Cats have minds of their own, and compared to dogs, are much harder to train. Some cat owners can teach their feline companions to sit, come when called and even give a high five.

Didga the cat lives in Australia, and her trainer taught her to swim and ride on a skateboard. The fact that her owner is an animal trainer helps. Talk about some extraordinary behavior management skills!

The Behavior Management Tool Tips and Advice

  • Aside from young children, most humans will resist having their behavior managed. As such, it is crucial to set a friendly tone, establish clear expectations and stay positive.
  • Take your time with behavior management tools. You will want to plan everything out ahead of time rather than springing it on your subjects.
  • Allow students to participate as much as you can. The plan will work best when they can choose from a group of rewards, whether it’s for the classroom, home or a work environment.

About The Author

Danielle Smyth 

Danielle Smyth is a writer and content marketing expert based in New York. She has been writing on business and finance, home and garden, DIY, travel and tourism, and a variety of other topics for over a decade, and she holds a Master of Science in Publishing from Pace University. Danielle loves working on product reviews and helping others find the highest quality items and the best values. As an avid runner and smoothie fanatic, Danielle understands the importance of choosing the right health and wellness products.