Callaway 300 Pro Slope Laser Rangefinder

Last updated date: March 29, 2021

DWYM Score

9.4

Callaway 300 Pro Slope Laser Rangefinder

Why Trust DWYM?

DWYM is your trusted product review source. Along with our in-house experts, our team analyzes thousands of product reviews from the most trusted websites. We then create one easy-to-understand review. Learn more.

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval
Look for the DWYM seal for products that are the best in the category.
Show Contents

We looked at the top Rangefinders and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Rangefinder you should buy.

Update as March 29, 2021:
Checkout The Best Rangefinder for a detailed review of all the top rangefinders.

Overall Take

Not only does this rangefinder offer pin-locking technology, but it also calculates the slope adjusted distance for you. It features 6X magnification with a range spanning 5 to 1,000 yards. If you prefer, you can get that reading in meters instead.


In our analysis of 64 expert reviews, the Callaway 300 Pro Slope Laser Rangefinder placed 2nd when we looked at the top 13 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

The Callaway Golf 300 Pro laser golf rangefinder delivers all the distance measurement features golfers require to maximize your game! The ultimate piece of golf on-course gear, the Callaway 300 Pro laser rangefinder comes with many features including slope mode, P.A.T (Pin Acquisition Technology) with Pulse confirmation, high magnification, superior accuracy, and water/fog resistance. It’s equipped with 6x magnification and a 5 – 1000 yard total range with +/- 1 yard accuracy. Measures yards or meters. Now with specialized Slope Technology, our laser rangefinder automatically account for elevation changes, ensuring truly accurate distance measurements. With our P.A.T. with Pulse feature, you can quickly lock onto the pin up to 300 yards away, even with trees or other clutter in the background. The Pulse feature delivers a short vibrating “burst” when the laser locks onto the pin to confirm you have the correct distance. The newest 300 Pro model uses an external, switch to visibly enable or disable the slope function, which makes the 300 Pro laser legal for tournament play. Included is a premium molded hard case for extra protection with a convenient elastic band connector for faster engagement during play. Whether trying to carry that fairway bunker, or firing at the flagstick of an elevated green, you'll be able to pick the right club and take dead aim with confidence.

Expert Reviews

User Summarized Score

9.4
2,762 user reviews

What experts liked

What experts didn't like

An Overview On Rangefinders

If you like to hunt, you already know there is no shortage of tools to make your life easier. A rangefinder is one of those tools, allowing you to spot your prey far better than you ever could with the naked eye. But different types of hunting call for different types of rangefinders, so it’s important to know what to look for before you buy.

If you’re a bowhunter, angle-compensating software is essential since you need to be able to calculate the angle necessary to hit your mark. Rifle-geared rangefinders aren’t as sophisticated as precision-shooting rangefinders, which are made for those hunters who are very particular. You’ll find many rangefinders tackle the basics of helping you spot prey from a distance, but some have special features built for the type of hunting you’ll be doing.

Weather is an important consideration when you’re researching rangefinders. Some rangefinders are more waterproof than others, making them ideal for those early morning rainstorms. You’ll also find some rangefinders struggle to work in low lighting, forcing you to wait until daylight to get started.

Performance is going to be your top consideration with a rangefinder, which means you’ll need to look at distance abilities. Some rangefinders are built to read targets from farther away than others, which is something worth considering if you want to cover a broad distance. But once your rangefinder has spotted a target, the reading it gives needs to be accurate and quick as well. The goal is to be able to spot your target and take action in milliseconds, rather than wasting valuable time.

Lastly, tripod compatibility will also be a factor if you want to be in hands-free mode. In some cases, you can simply buy an inexpensive tripod sleeve to turn your handheld into a mounted device in a matter of seconds. As you’re considering that, keep weight and size in mind. You’ll probably want a rangefinder that is easy to carry along with you as you head out on your hunts.

The Rangefinder Buying Guide

  • First, it’s important to factor in the type of hunting you’ll be doing. An angle or slope compensation distance feature, ensures your hold is illuminated even at the harshest angles. Whether you’re hunting with a rifle or bow, this feature can make a big difference.
  • If you’re looking for distance, go with a model that can target any range within a 2-mile distance. Distance depends on what you’re targeting, though. You can only range trees within 1,600 yards, and deer are limited to 1,300 yards.
  • Magnification also plays into how well a rangefinder performs. Some units offer 6X magnification, while other models only offers 5X.
  • You should also pay close attention to eye relief, which has to do with the distance between the eye and the lens. The minimum you can have with a clear view is 15mm, so you’ll want to stay close to that range. Others provide 18mm eye relief.
  • Some rangefinders can be prone to errors, so it’s important to look at advertised accuracy ratings. Some rangefinders have exceptional accuracy, displaying readings that are exact to the nearest 1/10 yard. Other rangefinders only promise range increments in 1 yard.
  • You don’t have time to waste once your rangefinder spots something. For that reason, scanning speed is essential. Look for rangefinders that use HyperScan™ Technology to provide four range updates per second when in scan mode. Some rangefinders, by comparison, can take one to four seconds to offer a reading.
  • Some hunters like to set their rangefinders on a tripod to keep their hands free for when they need to take action. Consider a model with a separately sold sleeve that you can use with a tripod.
  • It’s also important to consider size and weight if you’ll be carting your rangefinder around all day. A small and light model may measure 3.1 by 4 by 1.6 inches and weigh 12 ounces.
  • You won’t always have dry conditions, so it’s important to consider how weatherproof your rangefinder is. Go with a rangefinder that is both water-resistant and rainproof.
  • Some rangefinders struggle in low light. Since you probably won’t limit your trips to daylight hours, you need to look for a rangefinder that can perform when the sun goes down. Consider a rangefinder that uses red digital lights that stand out against all types of backgrounds, as well as keeps visibility high at night. You can adjust the lighting display for whatever time of day it is.
  • Rangefinders can be on the expensive side, but you can find a high-quality model that fits your budget.