Winsor & Newton Water Colour Brush Markers, 12 ct

Last updated: July 1, 2021

Winsor & Newton Water Colour Brush Markers, 12 ct

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We looked at the top Watercolor Markers and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Watercolor Marker you should buy.

Overall Take

The pigment inside the Winsor & Newton Water Colour Brush Markers, 12 ct, allows these markers to blend seamlessly into standard watercolor paints. As an added bonus, the dual tips make drawing fine lines.

In our analysis of 7 expert reviews, the Winsor & Newton Water Colour Brush Markers, 12 ct placed 12th when we looked at the top 14 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

A lightweight metal box containing 12 assorted Winsor & newton water color markers – an outstanding range of highly pigmented lightfast markers, delivering Winsor & newton’s superb water color performance with precision. Twin-Tipped with a fine point and flexible brush nib, perfect for multiple line thickness and superior detailing. Create art with the water color markers dry, wet or blended with a brush. Excellent flow and blending in 36 stunning shades. For the best results, use Winsor & newton water color paper. Intermixable with other Winsor & newton water color products, dry, wet, or blended.

Expert Reviews


What experts liked

They are portable and convenient to use. You can use them sitting down or even standing up. Once you're done, you can put the cap back, and throw them into your pencil case and leave. They are great for fast and loose sketches.
Excellent light fastness rating

What experts didn't like

Markers are not good at covering large areas compared to using a watercolour brush, and streaking marks have to be carefully controlled unless that's the look you're looking for. It's not easy to mix colours with markers, and this may make you want to get more markers, and hence spend more money.
Doesn’t include blending marker

Our Expert Consultant

Amy Markham  
Artist and art educator

Artist and educator Amy Markham is the creator of Starling, a podcast dedicated to helping artists develop depth in their creative practice. A graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, Amy has been an art educator since 2001. Today, she teaches middle school art at a school outside of Memphis, Tennessee. Her personal artwork explores myth-making and symbolic understandings. Through her brand, Starling Creative Living, she leads others to explore art production as a method for enriching their life experience.

Overview

Creating smooth watercolor effects on a piece of paper or canvas has all sorts of calming effects and can bring simple peace and joy to the artist. Cleaning up at the end, however, can be a messy ordeal that is noticeably less soothing than the act of painting. Watercolor markers offer a chance to replicate all the brush strokes and paint effects of watercolor painting, but they come in a basic marker that has a cap on it. Use the watercolor markers to make detailed lines and create drawings that have more precision than your standard watercolor paintbrush can offer, then put the caps back on your markers and toss them into your bag for the easiest cleanup you can imagine.

There is one big distinction that actually separates watercolor markers from traditional watercolor paints. Watercolor markers are actually full of dye and not the usual pigment that makes up the color of watercolor paints, according to Amy Markham, artist, art teacher and creator of Starling, a podcast dedicated to helping artists develop depth in their creative practice.

“Most watercolor markers on the market are not actually watercolor at all, although they can create a similar effect,” Markham points out. “Watercolor paint is pigment-based, where watercolor markers are dye-based.”

Each style of watercolor paint has its benefits, but the watercolor markers steal the show when it comes to fine details and vibrancy that the combination of watercolor pencils and paint can achieve. The two mediums of dye and pigment cannot necessarily be used together without thought, says Markham.

“Both are capable of creating interesting effects but only pigment-based ones can really be used along with traditional watercolor paints. If you want to use the dye-based markers with watercolor paint, it should only be used on top of the paint to detail and glaze,” Markham adds. “They should never be used under watercolor paint as it will not mix well.”

Watercolor markers, sometimes referred to as brush pens, have a soft tip that mimics a fine tip paintbrush. This tip is fed the wet color from within, but it behaves very similarly to a fine paintbrush when you begin using it. The easiest way to use them is to draw in the lines and colors where you want them and then come back with a bit of water on a clean brush to blend the fine lines down and create the style you imagine when you think of watercolor paintings. There is a useful water brush that comes with some sets that can be filled with clean water at the beginning of your session and used to blend colors without adding any further dye or pigment to them. With this handy water brush, you might not even need to have a cup of water on hand while making your watercolor painting — one less spilling hazard!

To add even more convenience to your artistic endeavors, there are kits that have dual tips on each marker. One end is a very fine tip that will help make highly detailed and precise lines in your work, which is no easy feat when using a traditional brush. The other end of the marker is a broader tip that helps fill in large swaths of color when you need it to. This combination of tips makes the markers highly versatile, which can be a great selling point for someone who is thinking of making this hobby as low-fuss as possible.

Even though they use a water-based dye instead of pigmentation, watercolor markers can still vary in their vibrancy of color, just like a pigmented paint does. The price of a set of watercolor markers is often related to how rich and colorful the dyes used are.

Consider a set of watercolor markers that actually uses pigment for its color. The set typically has dual-tip markers, which are a real treat to paint with, and vibrant pigment-based colors on the inside. This means that the paint coming from these markers can actually blend naturally with other watercolor paints on your paper or canvas. This set is a highly useful tool in fine-tuning the details within a watercolor painting while still allowing the different colors to mix nicely with each other.

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