First Alert CO710 Digital Temp Carbon Monoxide Alarm

Last updated date: April 29, 2021

DWYM Score

9.4

First Alert CO710 Digital Temp Carbon Monoxide Alarm

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We looked at the top Carbon Monoxide Alarms and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Carbon Monoxide Alarm you should buy.

Update as April 29, 2021:
Checkout The Best Carbon Monoxide Alarm for a detailed review of all the top carbon monoxide alarms.

Overall Take

With this carbon monoxide alarm, you get a backlit LED that shows you the temperature and CO concentration. You can also press a button to see the peak level the CO in the area has reached. The 10-year lithium battery gives you peace of mind, but you'll also get an end-of-life alert to let you know when it's time to replace the unit itself.


In our analysis, the First Alert First Alert CO710 Digital Temp Carbon Monoxide Alarm placed 2nd when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

The First Alert CO710 Carbon Monoxide Alarm with 10-Year Battery and Digital Temperature Display detects dangerous carbon monoxide for up to 10 years. This carbon monoxide detector uses an electrochemical carbon monoxide sensor, the most accurate CO detection technology available, to detect the CO you can't see, smell, or taste in the air. A built-in 10-year lithium battery means you never need to worry about changing batteries during the lifetime of the alarm. This stylish CO monitor is designed to sit on top of a dresser or tabletop, and it has a backlit digital display that clearly shows the ambient temperature, as well as current and peak CO concentrations. An 85-decibel horn sounds if carbon monoxide levels are too high, and a test/silence button silences the alarm and allows you to test its functionality.

An Overview On Carbon Monoxide Alarms

Carbon monoxide is a silent danger that can lurk in any home. It can cause serious health problems and even death.

Unfortunately, carbon monoxide is both colorless and odorless, making it impossible to detect on your own. Carbon monoxide can be released by malfunctioning appliances. When this happens in a closed, unventilated space like a house, carbon monoxide can gradually build up so much that it becomes harmful.

The best way to detect the presence of carbon monoxide in an enclosed space is with the use of a carbon monoxide detector. There are three types of detectors: biomimetic, which uses a gel that changes color in the presence of CO; metal oxide semiconductor, which uses a silica chip; and electrochemical, which has electrodes in a chemical solution that sense changes in electrical currents due to elevated CO levels.

But you need a device that does more than detect the presence of carbon monoxide. It also needs to set off an alert when levels reach a certain threshold. The type of alert can be voice-based or as a beep, but whatever you choose, make sure you won’t miss it if the alarm does go off.

The Carbon Monoxide Alarm Buying Guide

  • Some carbon monoxide detectors are also smoke detectors to give your home full protection. However, if you go this route, make sure you’re getting the best of each of those devices in one. Otherwise, you’ll be better off investing in separate smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • For best results, place your detector close to the area where you sleep so that it will wake you up if it goes off while you’re sleeping. It should be about five feet from the floor. If your home has multiple stories, you need one for each story.
  • Infrared photoelectric sensor-based detectors tend to do a better job without false alarms than the type that uses a gel or silica chip.
  • It’s important to consider how your detector is powered. Some will plug into a power outlet, while others use a battery. Battery-powered detectors can fail if the battery goes bad, but they also will continue to work during power outages.
  • How you’re alerted is important. Most alarms use a tone like a beep, although some are voice-based.
  • It can also be nice to be able to check the current CO levels with the press of a button. Some detectors let you see the peak carbon monoxide levels within a recent timeframe. This will help you not just see what current levels are, but whether they’ve increased to dangerous levels in recent days or weeks.­