Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Cookware, Everyday Pan

Last updated date: October 29, 2019

DWYM Score
9.4


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We looked at the top Braisers and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Braiser you should buy.

Overall Take

The Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Cookware Everyday Pan is the best stainless braiser. It serves as both a braiser and skillet. The compact design and tight-fitting lid make this pan one that you will be reaching for on a daily basis for your cooking needs. During our testing, we liked the handy transparent lid, which made it easy to check on our food while cooking. It was also very lightweight. In our analysis of 51 expert reviews, the Calphalon Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Cookware, Everyday Pan placed 3rd when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note October 23, 2019:
Checkout The Best Braiser for a detailed review of all the top braisers.

Expert Summarized Score
7.7
3 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
8.3
497 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
These Calphalon stainless steel pots and pans are oven safe up to 500F. So you can safely move it from the stove to the broiler or oven for the finishing touch to your favorite dishes.
- The Cookware Advisor
Tri-Ply has a very classic look. Like most high-quality stainless-steel cookware, it’s attractive and timeless.
- House Tipster
May 1, 2017 | Full review
What experts didn't like
One complaint is that the glass lids get pretty hot during cooking. A problem that is easily solved with the use of a potholder.
- The Cookware Advisor
My only complaint with the quality of Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Cookware is the balance of the pots and pans with long handles, such as the sauté pan and the saucepans
- House Tipster
May 1, 2017 | Full review

From The Manufacturer

Tri-Ply stainless combines the even heating of lightweight aluminum with the durability and corrosion-resistance of steel in an elegant design. Aluminum core between 2 stainless steel layers provides even heating for excellent browning and control of the cooking process. Non-porous stainless steel cooking surface is safe for use with all utensils. Elegant brushed stainless steel exterior can go from the oven or stove directly to the table. Reflective cook surface makes it easy to monitor foods as they cook and remains beautiful over time. Clear tempered-glass lids let you see food while it's cooking and are oven safe, so you can finish covered dishes in the oven or keep them warm until ready to serve Shaped like a traditional sauté pan, but with two loop handles so it easily moves from stovetop to oven to table. Ideal for casseroles and "brown and braise" recipes. Long, brushed stainless steel handles stay cool on the stovetop. All cookware is dishwasher-safe and carries Calphalon's full lifetime warranty.

An Overview On Braisers

One long-standing method for cooking meats and vegetables is to use high heat and a little oil to first brown our foods before slowly simmering them in cooking liquid. This method of braising can be done by amateurs and professional chefs alike to easily bring robust flavors to our dishes.

Kristin Forte/Simplemost Media

Braising provides a nice caramelized, brown crust that really brings out the nuanced flavors of specific cuts of meat. It also allows them to cook at a slower pace and have time to truly soak in the seasonings. This process, also ideal for browning and caramelizing vegetables, lets the food gather flavor as the liquid evaporates and circulates back over the top of the meats and vegetables with the help of a tightly fitting lid.

Kristin Forte/Simplemost Media

“Braising is best done in a pan designed for the purpose,” culinary expert Julie Chernoff, member of Les Dames d’Escoffier, dining editor of Better magazine, and food journalist, says. “But don’t worry … this pan will be one of the most versatile in our cooking arsenal.”

She says the best pans are large, with a flat bottom and high sides to accommodate larger cuts of meat or a stew. An ideal set of braising cookware will be especially wide at the base, as seen in the Tramontina Enameled Cast Iron Covered Braiser. That provides a lot of surface area, so that all of the meats and vegetables can have direct contact with the pan directly while searing.

Kristin Forte/Simplemost Media

“Because you don’t want to overcrowd proteins in a pan when searing them — that would lead to steaming rather than to the desired caramelization — most recipes have you sear the meat in batches. Larger pans mean fewer batches are necessary,” Chernoff explains. “You’re looking for a pan that is made of heavy metal, which protects against burning and promotes even heating.”

The pan should also be deep enough to allow you to add your liquids and other spices or ingredients before placing the lid on to allow it all to simmer together. This will tenderize your meats and vegetables to the perfect temperature and texture. The depth of the braiser can determine how much food you can create in the one dish, generally ranging from three to seven quarts in volume. A deep pan, like the Cuisinart 7 Qt Round Casserole, can be very handy in creating large batches of soup, chili or stews for a large crowd, or for those of us who like to meal prep large quantities of food to have handy for the upcoming week. Deeper, larger pans also mean fewer dirty dishes during the process of creating your meal and also gives a lot of flexibility to how the braiser can be used in the kitchen.

Kristin Forte/Simplemost Media

Many of the braisers that top the product category also boast a design that allows them to go in the oven for the latter half of the cooking process. The Le Creuset Signature Enameled Cast-Iron 3 1/2 Qt. has large handles that can be easily picked up and maneuvered while wearing oven mitts. As a general rule, it would be wise to stay away from any products which have rubberized handles that aren’t rated for oven temperatures up to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.

A braiser will need to have a heavy, tight-fitting lid to help circulate all the steam and flavoring back into the dish as it simmers on the stove or in the oven. The lid doesn’t have to be anything too fancy, but it should have an easy-to-use handle that can be grabbed while wearing an oven mitt. You should always be mindful to not put your face directly over the pan when removing the lid, as there will generally be a release of steam.

Another part of the design to look out for in most braisers is two handles, one on each side of the pan, which allow a solid grip while picking it up and moving it. A long single handle, like seen on many frying pans, will get very hot and could be dangerous if the user doesn’t exercise caution.

Kristin Forte/Simplemost Media

Safety and balance are key when it comes to handles, Remember, though, that those double handles will get hot, too.

“Don’t forget your oven mitts,” Chernoff advises. “Moving hot liquid around is no joke!”

Braisers are truly a multi-use cookware set, as touted by the Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Cookware, Everyday Pan. As it suggests in its name, you might find yourself grabbing this option for most of your daily cooking needs. It provides the versatility many look for while shopping for new cookware. For example, the low stance of a braising pan allows it to be used for simple frying tasks, like cooking eggs, but provides room to use your spatula to flipping things and moving food around.

Kristin Forte/Simplemost Media

Many braisers are even coated with nonstick ceramic finishes that make cleaning them a breeze; just a little soap and hot water will allow you to easily remove all the food debris you created from cooking. You won’t need to use a  scrubber and a good amount of elbow grease to get them clean.

But braising is a great way to get the most out of tougher, less expensive cuts of meat, so having one of these pans on hand is a great idea.

“This cooking method is ideal for short ribs, osso buco, pork shoulder, chicken cacciatore and more,” Chernoff notes.

DYWM Fun Fact

Braised meats became popular in European cooking in the 19th century when many families began braising large cuts of red meat, like pot roasts and mutton. This was not only a simple approach to feeding large groups of people, but also a nearly fool-proof method of creating a flavorful dish. The term originated in France, where “braiser” was a method that referred to the use of both dry and wet heats in the creation of a dish. The method of cooking catered to the working class people of the time who didn’t always have fresh meats or expensive ingredients to use. The idea of tenderizing older or tougher meat while also being able to add simple ingredients, like broth and onions, helped make the idea popular.

The Braiser Buying Guide

When looking to purchase a braiser, there are a number of factors to keep in mind that will help ensure that your new cookware lives up to the task.

  • Find a braising pan that has a large bottom surface area. In order to brown or sear your meats and vegetables, they should have as much contact with the hot surface of the pan as possible. Any pieces stacked above the bottom layer will not braise, but will start cooking slowly as the heat passes up to them.
  • Determine how many portions of food you will generally want to make in your braiser. A smaller braiser can hold a few quarts of food, which is often enough to feed an average family. A deeper braiser will let you build a much larger dish that can be divided up into many more servings. But the depth of the pan will not allow for browning more meat, so this option is best suited for stews or soups, where the larger volume is beneficial.
  • Look carefully at the specs of both the lid and the pan. Make sure that both will handle the high temperatures of roasting in the oven, which is often the method used for the simmering portion of the recipe.
  • Choose a pan that is easy to lift with two hands while wearing oven mitts. This will also make the pan more compact as it won’t have one long handle and will, therefore, fit more conveniently in your cupboard when in storage.
  • Braisers can come in many beautiful colors as well. If you like the idea of taking the simmering dish out of the oven and setting it directly on the table for serving, look for an aesthetically pleasing color and finish. If you’re looking for a braiser that will look nice on the table as a serving dish, you may want to lean toward purchasing one that has a thicker construction, which will help the dish retain its heat over the course of the meal. A thicker enamel-coated cast iron braiser will keep foods hot much longer than a thinner stainless steel model. The thicker braisers will also help eliminate hot-spots as the food simmers.
  • If you intend to use the braiser as a skillet, look at the braisers that will cater to that need. It should have a shorter depth that allows you to get down to the bottom of the pan easily with a spatula or other utensil.
  • Note that some braisers have a glass lid while others have an opaque lid that matches the pan. The glass lid has the benefit of allowing the user to see into the pan and check on your food. Other than that, both types of lids serve the same function during the cooking process.