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The Best Laptop Microphone - 2021

Last updated on July 19, 2021
Best Laptop Microphone

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Our Picks For The Top Laptop Microphones

Show Contents
Our Take
  Our Top Pick

Fifine K669B Metal Condenser Recording Laptop Microphone

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval

Fifine

K669B Metal Condenser Recording Laptop Microphone

Overall Take

Solid For RecordingThis all-purpose mic can be placed most anywhere and still deliver quality audio.

  Runner Up

Bietrun Noise Cancelling Laptop Microphone

Bietrun

Noise Cancelling Laptop Microphone

Overall Take

Extremely VersatileYou can use this laptop microphone for streaming, attending Zoom meetings, recording content and gaming with friends.

  We Also Like

TONOR TC-777 Tripod USB Laptop Microphone

TONOR

TC-777 Tripod USB Laptop Microphone

Overall Take

Blocks Out NoiseEnjoy quality sound without background interference with this laptop microphone.

  Strong Contender

TKGOU Plug & Play USB Laptop Microphone

TKGOU

Plug & Play USB Laptop Microphone

Overall Take

Durable, Simple SetupEnjoy easy configuration and great range with this laptop microphone.

Avatar
Guide written by Tod Caviness
Last updated on July 19, 2021

You’re used to seeing and hearing the world through your computer, but what happens when it’s time for people to hear you? Whether you’re chatting with teammates in your favorite first-person shooter or putting your talents out there with your first podcast, there comes a time when the tiny mic next to your camera just won’t do. Trading up to a full-fledged laptop microphone can be a small step in terms of cash, but it can pay off big in sound quality.

The first obstacle you’ll encounter when shopping for a microphone of any kind is a fair amount of jargon. So before you run screaming to your roadie cousin, let’s break down some of the common features of a laptop microphone.

First, there’s the connection. While you may find some wireless models that connect to your computer by Bluetooth, most mics will plug into your laptop by a USB cable. You can expect the USB versions to have superior sound quality, though the difference might be negligible if you’re using the mic for gaming or casual chats. Most USB mics have a couple of important built-in circuits: An A/D converter and a preamp. The A/D converter takes the analog sound captured by the mic and turns it into a data file that your computer can easily work with. The preamp boosts the signal so that your voice (or whatever you’re recording) comes out more or less the way you hear it — no mixing board required.

Then there’s the way these microphones actually capture sound. Most USB microphones are condenser mics that use a quick-moving diaphragm that interacts with a fixed backplate. Without getting too technical, the interaction between those two components allows a good condenser mic to capture even the smallest sounds in the general vicinity. That’s ideal if you’re gaming or chatting on a voice call in a quiet room. No matter which way you bob, weave or recline, you can be sure the microphone will pick up your voice.

You can also find dynamic laptop microphones, though they are rarer (and generally a bit more expensive). These mics don’t pick up quiet noises as easily, but they are great at effectively translating louder sounds in a wide area. As such, they are best for recording live music and other atmospheric sounds. For a laptop user, that means podcasting with a lot of guests or recording outdoor scenes.

The way these microphones pick up ambient sound can be further refined by their polar pattern or pickup pattern.

Omnidirectional mics, as you might imagine, pick up sound from all around the microphone, in all directions. Again, a great option if you don’t expect a lot of background interference.

Cardioid microphones pick up sound mainly from the front, with less interference from the side and hardly any pickup from the rear. This is ideal for solo podcasters or those on an important zoom call.

Bi-directional mics can catch sound from the front of the mic and the rear, but very little from the sides. This is a great budget option for podcasters who do a lot of one-on-one interviews.

Some higher-end microphones will even be able to switch between polar patterns, allowing you to suit your pickup to the occasion. If you plan on recording professional-grade vocals, you may want to consider a more dedicated microphone that can jack directly into a mixing board. But for versatility and ease of use, nothing beats the latest USB mics.

The Best Laptop Microphones

1
  Our Top Pick

Fifine K669B Metal Condenser Recording Laptop Microphone

Whether you're using it for gaming, podcasting or video calls, this laptop microphone holds up against more expensive models. It picks up sound at a distance without bringing in undue background noise. The included stand works on most any surface.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Fifine
Model
2
  Runner Up

Bietrun Noise Cancelling Laptop Microphone

This plug-and-play laptop microphone is compatible with Windows, Mac and PS4 systems. In addition to eliminating surrounding noise, this microphone also comes with a mute button. The included metal stand has a heavy round base that keeps the microphone upright, so you can use it hands-free.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Bietrun
Model
3
  We Also Like

TONOR TC-777 Tripod USB Laptop Microphone

This one is advertised as a gaming mic, but it can fit most any need. The calibration allows it to pick up the mid-range speech that's needed without a lot of background noise. That capability gets even better once you use the included pop filter.

Features


Specifications

Brand
TONOR
Model
4
  Strong Contender

TKGOU Plug & Play USB Laptop Microphone

The durable construction makes this laptop microphone ideal for gaming. The range is especially impressive, allowing it to pick up conversation easily from across the desktop. The setup is plug and play at its easiest.

Features


Specifications

Brand
TKGOU
Model
5
  Also Great

MAONO PM461TR USB Laptop Microphone

Whether you're looking to record a podcast, create a YouTube video or Skype with your boss, this laptop microphone is a must-have tool. The microphone features a gain knob that allows users to adjust the mic's sensitivity. It also offers superb sound quality, thanks to the built-in professional sound chipset and the 14-millimeter diaphragm condenser.

Features


Specifications

Brand
MAONO
Model
6

JOUNIVO USB Goosneck Laptop Microphone

The streamlined design of this laptop mic means you don't need to fiddle with volume or other controls. Everything can be adjusted through Windows, though the default settings are great for most users. The omnidirectional pickup makes it great for podcasting or any general audio use.

Features


Specifications

Brand
JOUNIVO
Model
7

CMTECK Corded Laptop Microphone

Setup is simple for almost anyone on this USB mic. The wide base means you can adjust it easily on any surface. Sound quality holds up well against most major models and the mute button is a plus.

Features


Specifications

Brand
CMTECK
Model

Our Laptop Microphone Buying Guide

You’re used to seeing and hearing the world through your computer, but what happens when it’s time for people to hear you? Whether you’re chatting with teammates in your favorite first-person shooter or putting your talents out there with your first podcast, there comes a time when the tiny mic next to your camera just won’t do. Trading up to a full-fledged laptop microphone can be a small step in terms of cash, but it can pay off big in sound quality.

The first obstacle you’ll encounter when shopping for a microphone of any kind is a fair amount of jargon. So before you run screaming to your roadie cousin, let’s break down some of the common features of a laptop microphone.

First, there’s the connection. While you may find some wireless models that connect to your computer by Bluetooth, most mics will plug into your laptop by a USB cable. You can expect the USB versions to have superior sound quality, though the difference might be negligible if you’re using the mic for gaming or casual chats. Most USB mics have a couple of important built-in circuits: An A/D converter and a preamp. The A/D converter takes the analog sound captured by the mic and turns it into a data file that your computer can easily work with. The preamp boosts the signal so that your voice (or whatever you’re recording) comes out more or less the way you hear it — no mixing board required.

Then there’s the way these microphones actually capture sound. Most USB microphones are condenser mics that use a quick-moving diaphragm that interacts with a fixed backplate. Without getting too technical, the interaction between those two components allows a good condenser mic to capture even the smallest sounds in the general vicinity. That’s ideal if you’re gaming or chatting on a voice call in a quiet room. No matter which way you bob, weave or recline, you can be sure the microphone will pick up your voice.

You can also find dynamic laptop microphones, though they are rarer (and generally a bit more expensive). These mics don’t pick up quiet noises as easily, but they are great at effectively translating louder sounds in a wide area. As such, they are best for recording live music and other atmospheric sounds. For a laptop user, that means podcasting with a lot of guests or recording outdoor scenes.

The way these microphones pick up ambient sound can be further refined by their polar pattern or pickup pattern.

Omnidirectional mics, as you might imagine, pick up sound from all around the microphone, in all directions. Again, a great option if you don’t expect a lot of background interference.

Cardioid microphones pick up sound mainly from the front, with less interference from the side and hardly any pickup from the rear. This is ideal for solo podcasters or those on an important zoom call.

Bi-directional mics can catch sound from the front of the mic and the rear, but very little from the sides. This is a great budget option for podcasters who do a lot of one-on-one interviews.

Some higher-end microphones will even be able to switch between polar patterns, allowing you to suit your pickup to the occasion. If you plan on recording professional-grade vocals, you may want to consider a more dedicated microphone that can jack directly into a mixing board. But for versatility and ease of use, nothing beats the latest USB mics.

DWYM Fun Fact

The device we think of as a microphone wasn’t invented until the 1870s, but the term was coined long before that by English inventor Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1827. His invention of the telegraph was just one of his forays into the study of sound, and Wheatstone was one of the first scientists to recognize that sound traveled in waves. It would be decades later before Emile Berliner collaborated with a scrappy American inventor named Thomas Edison on a crude voice transmitter for his nascent telephone.

The Laptop Microphone Tips and Advice

Want a little refinement on those vocals, especially when it comes to spoken word? You might want to invest in a pop filter for your microphone. These thin screens guard the mic against plosives, which is a fitting term for those tiny “pops” caused by fast-moving air. They tend to happen most often when people sharply pronounce the “p” sound, and they can be an almost subliminal source of irritation for sensitive listeners.


About The Author

Avatar
Tod Caviness 

As a homeowner of seven years and a journalist for the past 20, Tod Caviness had to learn to be a handyman quick — or at least stock a garage like one. He's happy if he can log as many weekly hours on his stationary bike as he does on PS4 strategy games, but how-to sites on the internet win out over both of them.