Yale Security Wi-Fi Hands-Free Door Lock For Homes

Last updated: May 31, 2023

Yale Security Wi-Fi Hands-Free Door Lock For Homes

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We looked at the top Door Locks For Homes and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Door Lock For Home you should buy.

Overall Take

With this door lock for home, you'll never need to hide a key under your doormat for family or friends. The unit is compatible with Google Assistant, Philips Hue, Apple HomeKit and Alexa. It features an easy-to-use touchscreen and allows for automatic locking just a few seconds after the door has been closed.

In our analysis of 35 expert reviews, the Yale Security Wi-Fi Hands-Free Door Lock For Homes placed 7th when we looked at the top 13 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Lose your keys, for good: Hands full? Have your door unlock for you with Auto-Unlock. Or unlock using the keypad, or Yale Access app on your smartphone or Apple Watch. Enjoy key-free access and leave the bulky keychain behind. Expand your smart home: Connect your lock to your favorite voice assistant or smart home system. Works with Amazon Alexa, Hey Google, Airbnb, Philips Hue, Apple HomeKit, and more. Includes the Wi-Fi Connect Bridge so there’s no additional hub needed. Auto-Locks and Unlocks: Your Assure Lock will Auto-Unlock as you get home for totally hands-free unlocking. With Auto-Lock and DoorSense, your home automatically secures once your door is closed, or after a set amount of time. Easy to install on any door: Not so handy? Not a problem. Yale Assure locks are super easy to install and are guaranteed to fit standard doors (doors 1-¾” to 2-¼” thick. Doors under 1-⅜” require thin door kit). Digital keys are the new hide-a-key. Quickly and easily share permanent, temporary or scheduled access with friends, family, and people you trust, and never hide a key under the doormat again.

Expert Reviews


What experts liked

What experts didn't like

Our Expert Consultant

Vicki Liston 
Home Improvement Expert

Vicki Liston writes, produces, and narrates “On The Fly…DIY,” an award-winning home improvement and DIY show of unique project tutorials for the casual DIY’er.

Home improvement and all things DIY have been Liston’s passion since she bought her first house in 2007 and she started making video blogs in 2014. She’s performed hundreds of DIY projects, from small ones to major, wall-smashing renovations and can teach you how to make a trendy DIY barn door for cheap. The proceeds earned from “On The Fly…DIY” are donated to no-kill animal shelters and rescue organizations.

Overview

A door lock could be the only thing standing between criminals and your family, your valuables, and your sense of security. Unfortunately, you might not realize that a lock is subpar until it is too late.

Upgrading an outdated door lock for your home can be an investment you will never regret. Choosing between brands, designs, and styles might be daunting, but learning about essential aspects of door locks for homes narrows your options.

Vicki Liston writes, produces, and narrates “On The Fly…DIY,” an award-winning home improvement and DIY show of unique project tutorials for the casual DIY’er.

Protecting your home from intruders is of the utmost importance.

“Thieves are trickier than ever and to stay ahead of their latest tactics,” says Liston. “You’ve got to have a door lock built to withstand numerous types of entry attempts.”

However, the most common way burglars gain entrance is rudimentary.

“The no-nonsense way of getting past a lock is to kick it in,” Liston explains. “Seriously. If your lock has a strike plate with only ¾ inch long screws holding it into the door frame, a swift kick will dislodge the screws, and your thief has open access.

“Look for a lock with much longer anchoring screws, so they hold tight to the frame. Four 3-inch screws should be your minimum length. When I changed the lock on my front door, I discarded the included screws altogether and used four 4-inch wood screws.”

Brute force is not the only way thieves gain entrance into homes. They also use tools. Fortunately, an effective lock can help prevent this, as well.

“Lock-picking, bumping, and using a drill are all additional –and more subtle– ways an intruder can try and break into your home,” Liston acknowledges. “Lock-picking involves a set of tools to (you guessed it) pick the lock. Bumping requires a special key and a mallet, which ‘bumps’ the inner pins to realign to the special key’s shape and, thus, unlock. Drilling is not as subtle as the first two methods but involves using a cordless drill and destroying the lock mechanism to gain entry.

“Look for a door lock that is bump- and pick-resistant. A drill can damage almost any lock, but there are a few on the market that boast of being drill-resistant as well.”

Is a single or double cylinder best for the accompanying deadbolt?

“It depends,” advises Liston. “A single cylinder has a lock on the outside and a thumb turn on the inside. A double cylinder will require you to unlock with a key from both sides.

“Initially, I only used single cylinder locks as I was afraid of being stuck inside during an emergency, like a fire. However, I learned that the deadbolt wouldn’t do any good if a thief could just break a nearby window, reach in, and unlock the door. So, I only recommend single cylinders if there are no windows nearby. For doors with a window in close proximity, use a double cylinder but keep a spare key near each of these locks so everyone in the household knows where to grab it in case of an emergency.”

For further help in the decision-making process, compare the ANSI grade rating of potential door locks for your home.

“You’ll most often see a grade 3 rating, as these are commonly used in houses and apartments,” Liston shares. “If you are concerned about safety and security and you’re here doing your homework on door locks, I’d recommend a higher rating. ANSI grade 1 is the best you can get while grade 2 will still protect your home better than a ‘typical’ home lock.”

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