Ubisoft Watch Dogs 2

Last updated date: June 17, 2019

DWYM Score
8.5

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We looked at the top 1 Shooting Games and dug through the reviews from 9 of the most popular review sites including Games Radar, Tech Spot, The Verge, IGN Southeast Asia, Trusted Reviews, PC Gamer, Tech Radar, GameSpot, The Guardian and more. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Shooting Game you should buy.

Overall Take

You play a street-savvy hacker in "Watch Dogs 2," and your ability to influence the tech around you is a highlight in this open-world adventure. The imaginative missions and side activities are an improvement from the game's predecessor. Exploring the lush San Francisco setting is a blast. Online player-vs-player action also makes for a welcome enhancement. In our analysis of 36 expert reviews, the Ubisoft Ubisoft Watch Dogs 2 placed 3rd when we looked at the top 3 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note July 2, 2019:
Checkout The Best Shooting Game for a detailed review of all the top shooting games.

Expert Summarized Score
8.3
9 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
8.9
2,025 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
Watch Dogs 2 is a solid, satisfying sequel that successfully addresses the weaknesses of its predecessor.
- Games Radar
The San Francisco Bay Area looks great and is a blast to explore
- Tech Spot
Watch Dogs 2 makes good on the premise of its predecessor. It’s an open world action game where the focus on hacking makes it feel unique, instead of yet another third-person shooter.
- The Verge
November 14, 2016 | Full review
The other mode, Bounty Hunt, is an excellent spin on the typical police chase. When you max out your wanted meter (which you can do voluntarily by activating a mission instead of mowing down civilians), instead of calling in the military the police call in something far more lethal to stop your rampage: other players.
- IGN Southeast Asia
November 24, 2016 | Full review
Great setting and fun side-activities
- Trusted Reviews
April 5, 2017 | Full review
Because you have hacker smarts, you’re able to use drones, security cameras, or Marcus to interface with CTOS, an operating system embedded into city infrastructure, which means you can remotely influence anything connected to the system, like traffic lights, robots, and those handy explosive pipes, just by looking at them and pressing a button.
- PC Gamer
December 6, 2016 | Full review
Huge vibrant city ripe for exploration
- Tech Radar
November 15, 2016 | Full review
Watch Dogs 2 now supports seamless player-versus-player hacking online. You are free to turn this off if you wish, but knowing that you may have to stop what you're doing at the drop of a hat to find the nearby stranger tapping into your phone adds a small but appreciable layer to the experience
- GameSpot
November 23, 2016 | Full review
The game’s best missions are its most open, using your hacking abilities – environmental manipulation being the main one – as well as your two most useful tools; an RC hopper car that’s capable of remote hacking and sneaking through vents, and a quadcopter drone, useful for scouting environments from above.
- The Guardian
What experts didn't like
Hooking up with a friend in the first place isn’t so straightforward right now, however; I experienced several erroneous error messages whilst trying to connect, and then a handful of server-side lost connections mid-mission, too.
- Games Radar
Movement doesn't always feel under full control
- Tech Spot
The game can be frustrating at times. There are a few moments where missions feel too rigid, or where your goal is unclear. And the lack of any sort of manual save functionality means that if you fail partway through a mission, you often have to replay it from scratch.
- The Verge
November 14, 2016 | Full review
Watch Dogs 2 can get pretty chuggy. It’s playable, but if you’re sensitive to frame rate issues you will probably not be happy with that performance. The PS4 Pro handles the frame rate much better, though other than that the visual differences aren’t striking.
- IGN Southeast Asia
November 24, 2016 | Full review
Movement doesn’t always feel under full control
- Trusted Reviews
April 5, 2017 | Full review
Huge sections of the city are missing, and as such feels a bit misrepresentative for someone that lives there, but as a big mashup of the wealthy and tourist-heavy bits it works as satirical backdrop for an endless stream of Silicon Valley jabs and dick jokes (some pretty good ones, too).
- PC Gamer
December 6, 2016 | Full review
The main gripes levelled at it included a central character who was impossible to warm to, dreadful vehicle handling compounded by an overabundance of vehicular missions and that in general, despite its subject matter, it managed to be rather dull to play.
- Tech Radar
November 15, 2016 | Full review
Ubisoft does a great job of presenting the Bay Area in an attractive way that feeds intrepid tourists an impressive variety of sights. However, something’s definitely missing. You won't see a lot of pedestrians or cars on the street compared to similar games
- GameSpot
November 23, 2016 | Full review
Ubisoft games have often lacked good scripts, regularly resulting in cringe-inducing one-liners, but Watch Dogs 2 frequently delivers moments of heartwarming charm and sharp comedic satire.
- The Guardian

From The Manufacturer

Explore the birthplace of the tech revolution as Marcus Holloway, a brilliant young hacker who has fallen victim to ctOS 2.0's predictive algorithms and accused of a crime he did not commit. In Marcus' quest to shut down ctOS 2.0 for good, hacking is the ultimate weapon. Players can not only hack into the San Francisco Bay Area's infrastructure but also every person and any connected device they possess to trigger unpredictable chains of events in this vast open world.

Overall Product Rankings

1. Blizzard Overwatch: Origins Edition
Overall Score: 9.1
Expert Reviews: 9
2. Activison Call of Duty: Black Ops 4
Overall Score: 8.9
Expert Reviews: 9
3. Ubisoft Watch Dogs 2
Overall Score: 8.5
Expert Reviews: 9

An Overview On Shooting Games

  • It can’t get mentioned enough when buying a shooting game: You’re going to need online access through whatever system you use to play. Increasingly, the bulk of the action in these type of games consists of online multiplayer, which means you’ll be facing off against avatars played by gamers around the world. On current versions of the major consoles — Xbox One, Playstation 4 and Nintendo Switch — you’ll not only need internet access but a membership in their online service (Xbox Live, Playstation Plus or Nintendo Switch Online). Those cost extra if you don’t already have an account, and there are monthly or yearly membership options. They also may come with discounts or free access to other games plus additional media, so it can be worth it for hardcore gamers.
  • Are you buying this game for a child? It may seem redundant to say, but any shooter is going to involve a fair amount of violence. How much of it you care to expose your child to is up to you, but a quick look at the ESRB rating for the game can be helpful. Those ratings are set by the Entertainment Software Rating Board, and they’re generally pretty straightforward. Just like movie ratings, they not only give a recommended minimum age (Teen, 17+, etc.) but supply some brief reasons for their ratings. If you see descriptors like “blood and gore” or “intense violence,” the game might not be the best fit for impressionable tweens. Not every shooting game is a gorefest, however. “Overwatch” might feature intense gunfights, but its action is relatively cartoonish in comparison to the gritty realism of a “Call of Duty” match. And games like “Splatoon” are particularly kid-friendly, with bullets replaced by messy paint pellets. When in doubt, it’s best to search for gameplay videos online and get a look at the action firsthand.
  • The maxim of “buyer beware” doesn’t always stop after you bought the game. Video games these days may contain in-game purchases for content like extra outfits, maps or characters. Look for an “In-Game Purchases” warning on the box just below the ESRB rating, and supervise young players, accordingly.
  • Do you have a gaming headphone/microphone set? If not, it might be a good buy. Shooting games require a lot of cooperation online, and that’s best done in real time by talking to other players. Once again, if buying for young players, consider whether they’re ready to interact with the diverse age groups and personalities they may meet.

DYWM Fun Fact

It wasn’t technically the first first-person shooter, but 1992’s Wolfenstein 3D set the tone for all the shoot-em-ups to follow with its action based around a gory escape from a Nazi prison. It may seem quaint now, but there were days when this kind of bloodshed was considered too much for some gaming platforms. Most notable was Nintendo, whose SNES version of the game swapped out the blood for sweat and erased any Nazi imagery entirely — including Hitler’s mustache.

The Shooting Game Buying Guide

If you picture someone playing a modern video game, chances are you see a shooting game: a grizzled war hero or heavily armored space mercenary with guns blazing, mowing his or her way through hordes of enemies. It may be a cliché, but sometimes it’s a cliché because it’s true. Since the release of “Doom” in 1993, shooters have steadily grown in popularity in the gaming world. That popularity got a big boost with the advent of online multiplayer capability in the 2000s that allowed players to team up against their virtual foes — or more often, against each other — in games like those of the
“Halo series” and the recent smash hit, “Fortnite.”

As far as the storyline goes, shooting games can exist in any number of genres. Military settings, like that of the “Call of Duty” games, might be popular, but shooters can incorporate sci-fi elements or superheroic characters (or both, a la “Overwatch”). The avatar you control in a shooting game might fire bullets, laser beams or magical lightning bolts, but if he/she/it spends a majority of the game firing them, you’re probably playing a shooter.

You might also hear the term “first-person shooter” or FPS applied to a game. That’s in reference to the viewing mode of the in-game camera, where you appear to be looking directly through the eyes of your avatar — in other words, playing in first person perspective. It’s the most common setup for shooting games by far, although there are games where the default is a view from slightly behind the character or third person perspective. Occasionally, you can switch your view mode in the settings of the game. Some first-time players might find the FPS perspective jarring or tough to get used to, but there’s no denying that it’s immersive.

The current online multiplayer craze is the first thing you’ll want to consider when buying a shooting game for yourself or for your kids. Even though they might simulate the most antisocial behavior you can think of, modern shooters are by their very nature a social game. Players will mostly be facing off against and cooperating with other gamers in their personal network or around the world. If you’re looking for a game you can play solo — meaning without real competitors or partners, in the room or online — your options are going to be limited. Most console games these days require some sort of internet connection and possibly a subscription to a gaming network to unlock their full features. With shooting games, that connection is nearly essential.

That said, some shooting games do feature a solo mode that lets you go it alone. Most games in the “Call of Duty” series can be played in a campaign mode that lets you guide a character through a story that progresses in between shoot-em-ups. “Call of Duty: Black Ops 4,” the most recent iteration of its popular spin-off series, makes do with solo missions that don’t present a longer narrative. They’re largely a side attraction to the main event of its multiplayer battles, though. Other games like “Overwatch” do away with solo playability altogether and are built solely around their online multiplayer battles.

There’s a reason games like” Overwatch” and the “Call of Duty” series are so popular, of course. It can be great fun teaming up with other players online and testing your strategies against a new foe every game. It’s also the reason why people tend to gravitate towards games like these that are already popular. Once games like “Overwatch” or “Fortnite” get a big following, the pool of online players increases and support for the game ramps up from developers. Less successful games that are reliant on online multiplayer might be fun at first, but if they don’t make a big enough splash, you might find yourself waiting for players to join your match.

Choose wisely! The most popular shooting games may be pricey, but pick the right one and you’re unlocking the door to a world of unlimited opponents — and unlimited fun.