Tramontina 80116/007DS Gourmet Stainless Steel Induction-Ready Tri-Ply Skillet, 12-Inch

Last updated date: July 23, 2020

DWYM Score
7.6

Tramontina 80116/007DS Gourmet Stainless Steel Induction-Ready Tri-Ply Skillet, 12-Inch

Why Trust The DWYM Score?

DWYM is your trusted product review source. Along with our in-house experts, our team analyzes thousands of product reviews from the most trusted websites. We then create one easy-to-understand score. Learn more.

Look for the DWYM seal for products that are the best in the category.

We looked at the top Skillets and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Skillet you should buy.

Overall Take

In our analysis of 50 expert reviews, the Tramontina Tramontina Gourmet Stainless Steel Induction-Ready Tri-Ply Skillet, 12-Inch placed 15th when we looked at the top 15 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note July 28, 2020:
Checkout The Best Skillet for a detailed review of all the top skillets.

Expert Summarized Score
7.1
3 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
8.7
261 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
The Tramontina is a durable pan that’s comfortable to hold.
- New York Times Wirecutter
Handle temperature was excellent.
- Consumer Reports
Tramontina's 12-inch try-ply stainless steel skillet offers serious performance at a relatively affordable price.
- Epicurious
January 14, 2019 | Full review
What experts didn't like
The Tramontina has a smaller cooking surface (it’s about 8½ inches across) than our main pick, which can be limiting.
- New York Times Wirecutter
Ease of cleaning was poor.
- Consumer Reports
At 8.25 inches, the Tramontina had the smallest interior of all the pans we tested. As a result, the skillet felt a little crowded when searing a package of chicken thighs, and that lack of breathing room made browning more inconsistent.
- Epicurious
January 14, 2019 | Full review

From The Manufacturer

Sear, Brown, and pan fry with Tramontina tri-ply clad 12-in fry pan. Part of the company's exclusive gourmet collection, a series of premium products engineered and manufactured with the finest design, materials and workmanship, tri-ply clad cookware outperforms similar products within the market and delivers the best quality and value to the cooking professional and enthusiast alike. Providing exceptional performance, distributing heat quickly and evenly without hotspots, this cookware heats from all sides and not just the bottom! combining the impeccable beauty and durability of premium 18/10 Stainless steel and designed to withstand repeated usage, even in the most demanding kitchens, this NSF-certified cookware is ideal for home and professional cooks who want the utmost in quality and performance. Constructed of a satin finished 18/10 Stainless interior cooking surface, an internal layer of pure aluminum for optimum conductivity and a magnetic Stainless steel exterior, the full clad process makes this Tramontina cookware a valuable investment which will prove its worth each time it is used. The premium Stainless steel construction allows you to use this cookware on any cooktop, including induction. Features a riveted, ergonomic stainless-steel handle for extreme durability and Comfort. Dishwasher and oven-safe (up to 500 F or 260 C).

Overall Product Rankings

Utopia Kitchen Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Skillet, 12-Inch
2. Utopia Kitchen Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Skillet, 12-Inch
Overall Score: 9.4
Expert Reviews: 6
Matfer Bourgeat Steel Fry Pan Skillet, 11-Inch
13. Matfer Bourgeat Steel Fry Pan Skillet, 11-Inch
Overall Score: 8.0
Expert Reviews: 4

An Overview On Skillets

If your kitchen were a chessboard, the skillet would be your queen. A nice, deep skillet can do just about anything: sauté, stir-fry, braising, roasting. If it’s made of cast iron or similar materials, you can even add oven-roasting and baking to that list.

While any good skillet will be versatile, the material it’s made with is going to determine its specialties. Take the classic cast iron skillet. Everybody’s grandparents have one in their kitchen, for good reason. These weighty workhorses cook steak like nothing else, and — with a little TLC — are durable enough to handle thousands of meals on the stove or in the oven before getting passed on to the kids.

At the other end of the cooking spectrum, you have the nonstick pan. Lightweight and handy, these are typically made of quick-heating aluminum coated with a nonstick polymer that makes it a breeze to clean. They’re best for a nice plate of eggs or fish filet — soft foods that won’t abrade the surface.

In the sweet spot between the two is your stainless steel skillet. Steel is a great metal for retaining heat and distributing it evenly, making it the go-to choice for sauces, stir-fry, chicken, rice and a host of other everyday dishes. It’s also got natural nonstick properties, making it relatively easy to clean. In many cases, you’ll find skillets that are layered with an interior core of aluminum are ideal. The idea here is that aluminum heats up quicker, and then transfers that heat to the sturdier outer layer of steel.

In a nutshell, the meals you make are going to determine the skillet you need. That’s why most households have at least two options:  a nonstick for quick morning omelets and a cast iron or stainless steel pan for meats, veggies and other dinner staples.

DWYM Fun Fact

While it’s hard to trace the origins of the frying pan or skillet, the earliest examples of the cookware could be found in old Mesopotamia. Most early versions of pans were made from copper — a capable enough conductor of heat if you don’t mind the low-level copper poisoning that came with it. While that was probably not the biggest problem on the mind of a 3rd-century chef, today’s copper cookware comes with a protective coating that takes that worry away.

The Skillet Buying Guide

  • Using your skillet properly will not only result in better food in the short term, but a longer-lasting piece of cookware. Cast iron skillets can stand up to just about anything temperature-wise, but you’ll need to season it to get the most out of it. That involves coating it with a super-thin layer of oil and letting it bake in at high heat, a process that not only protects against rust but imparts a stick-resistant coating. Some cast-iron skillets come pre-seasoned, but a touch-up dab of oil every once in a while will help keep it protected.
  • Nonstick skillets require a lot less care, and that’s half the point. Just make sure you don’t put it through more than it was designed for. Most nonstick options aren’t safe for oven use, and even those that are have a max temperature that you’ll want to make sure not to exceed.
  • Cleaning your skillet also requires a little adjustment, depending on the material. Soap will actually wear away the seasoning on cast iron, but a decent one will actually clean off easier than you’d think with hot water and a brush. Just don’t put it in the dishwasher, or let it soak in water. Most nonstick skillets are dishwasher safe, but be sure to use a plastic brush that won’t abrade the polymer coating when washing by hand.
  • The weight of a skillet is something to consider long-term. Cast iron sounds heavy, and it usually is — especially with a pan full of steak. Older cooks might find it unwieldy enough to consider a stainless steel model instead.
  • The material of the handle is just as important as the base. Most skillets have a handle that’s made from a separate piece attached to the pan — ideally with rivets, which will hold longer than screws or bolts. A silicone-coated or wood handle will keep the coolest, no matter what’s cooking.
  • Check the base, especially if you’re cooking on an induction stovetop. Induction coils use an electromagnetic field that won’t work on sufficiently ferrous pans. Any pan with a metal base will do, and most will indicate if they’re induction-compatible.
  • Will you be whipping up a lot of sauces? Look for a skillet with a rolled lip that makes it easier to pour out the contents. Shaking up some stir-fry? Straight-edged lips are best at holding in the ingredients.