SterlingPro Large Stainless Steel French Press, 34-Ounce

Last updated: August 31, 2022

SterlingPro Large Stainless Steel French Press, 34-Ounce

Our Review Process

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We looked at the top French Presses and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best French Press you should buy.

Overall Take

Only the finest stainless steel was used to construct this French press. In addition to the press being rust and stain-resistant, it also features a double wall to keep the inside coffee warm and the outside wall cool to the touch. There's even an ergonomic handle for better control when pouring.

In our analysis of 78 expert reviews, the SterlingPro Large Stainless Steel French Press, 34-Ounce placed 7th when we looked at the top 18 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

There are thousands of large french press products for you to choose from – but don’t you want the best there is? Our coffee french press was one of the first such products (selling since 2014), has been given the ‘Best Overall’ award by an Amazon Verified Expert, and has sold over 280,000 units. Oh, and did we mention the 3000+ positive reviews its received?

Expert Reviews


What experts liked

The SterlingPro is a clone of the more expensive metal presses, like the high-end Frieling, and is only available on Amazon. Even though it has over 2,800 five-star reviews, could the quality of the French press and the coffee it produced really measure up to models that sold for three times the price? Short answer: yes!
Sterling Pro is the best choice if you’re after a large high-quality French press.
All stainless steel
Affordable

What experts didn't like

We love the Sterling Pro, but, as we mentioned before, its smallest model is a whole liter!
Small Capacity
Appears smaller than advertised capacity

Overview

The last decade or so has been a great time for coffee lovers. Barista culture has turned coffee-making from a morning chore into a ritual that incorporates equal parts science and art. Once-esoteric brewing methods like the pour over, cold brew and gravity siphoning are now options at an increasing number of coffee shops, from your local hipster cafe to the corner Starbucks.

But even the pickiest coffee snob will tell you that for a simple, elegant cup of java at home, nothing beats the good old French press. It’s a method that’s easy to do but infinitely customizable, and it has several advantages over the plain Jane drip coffeemaker or single-serve machine. First of all, there’s no paper filter or plastic pod to dispose of, which makes it eco-friendly. Once you get the hang of making it, you can have a hot cup in your hand quicker than drip coffee. Since there are no mechanical or electrical components to break down, a good French press will keep cranking out java for decades. And best of all, the mesh filter allows more oils from the beans to seep into the final brew. In layman’s terms, that means it just tastes better.

The actual method is simple enough for any first-timer to do. First, heat up your water in a separate pot to just shy of boiling — 200 to 205 degrees or so. While that’s heating up, add a heaping tablespoon of coffee grounds to your French press for every cup of water. If you’re using freshly ground coffee (and you should be), go with a coarser grind. It’s a mesh filter, so fine particles will tend to clog it up or seep into the brew. Next, add your water and stir thoroughly. Wait 3-5 minutes, push the plunger down, and voila! The filter will push the grounds to the bottom, leaving your coffee ready to be poured out of the top.

Once you’ve had a few cups, you can feel free to tweak any of the factors above. In fact, finding the recipe for your ideal cup is half the fun of owning a French press. Let’s be clear: The amount and type of beans, coarseness of your grind, water temperature and steeping time will all affect the flavor of your java much more than what type of French press you’re making it with.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t be choosy about your equipment. This is an item you’ll be using most every morning, after all. Since you’ll be cleaning it after every use, a French press that’s easy to disassemble is key. And while the ability to keep your coffee heated is one advantage that drip makers have over the French press, the materials it’s made with can help mitigate that.

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