SportsStuff Round Plastic Disc Sled

Last updated date: January 9, 2023

DWYM Score

7.7

SportsStuff Round Plastic Disc Sled

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We looked at the top Sleds and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Sled you should buy.

Update as January 9, 2023:
Checkout The Best Sled for a detailed review of all the top sleds.

Overall Take

Simple but useful, this 25-inch round disc sled is perfect for one rider. It has plastic handles to give you control as you move down the hill. The extra-slick bottom makes it sail over the snow to keep you moving.


In our analysis of 22 expert reviews, the SportsStuff Round Plastic Disc Sled placed 4th when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Classic 1 person plastic disc/saucer sled. Made with high impact plastic construction. Molded plastic handles allow the rider to steer down the hill. Super slick bottom. Measures 25in X 25in X 5in.

Expert Reviews

User Summarized Score

9.2
5,207 user reviews

What experts liked

Made from high-impact plastic resistant to low temperatures, it won't crack in the cold. The unit's slick bottom will ensure excellent gliding.
- Best Advisor
This long-lasting plastic saucer has a wide, 25-inch diameter for those big and small. The super slick bottom ensures that you or your little ones will ride fast down hills, regardless of how thick the snowfall is that day. There are also thick, sturdy handles on each side so the sledder can hold on tight.
- USA Today

What experts didn't like

It gets scratched pretty easily.
- Best Advisor

An Overview On Sleds

Sledding is a fun way to enjoy a snow day, but it does come with some risks. From 2008 to 2017, more than 220,000 people were treated for snow-sledding accidents, and children accounted for 69.7 percent of those injuries. Although fractures are the most common injury, head injuries are more common in children than adults.

But there are a few things you can do to keep sledding a little safer for you and your loved ones. First, helmets can go that extra mile toward preventing serious injuries, especially in younger sledders. Where you sled is also important. Less experienced sledders should stick with shorter hills until they gain the experience they need.

Your choice of a sled also makes a big difference. You’ll need to inspect it before each use to make sure there are no cracks or breaks that leave sharp edges behind. Also take a look at the sledding area and pay close attention to nearby obstacles like trees and fences. Ideally, your hill will have a gradual slope with a level surface at the end that will naturally slow the sled.

There are different types of sleds, including the traditional toboggan sled that features a flat board with an upward curve at the front. Today’s toboggans might substitute plastic for wood for a more durable, versatile option. One of the best things about toboggans is that they’re great for multi-person use.

Another classic sled still in use today is the flyer, which features wood slats that are risen above the ground with a metal frame. The steel frame and multiple size options have allowed it to stick around even as more compact options emerged.

Perhaps the most portable sled option is the saucer style. Typically only 25 to 30 inches in diameter, saucer sleds can be tossed in a trunk or the backseat of your car. Best of all, when you’re pulling it up the hill after riding it down, you won’t wear yourself out.

The Sled Buying Guide

  • Frostbite is always a risk when you’re outdoors in cold weather. Make sure you and your sledding companions are dressed for winter weather, including wearing gloves, warm socks, coats and a hat. Try to avoid any gaps in clothing, including pants legs, that could let snow and chilly air through.
  • Always sled in a seated position or on your back with your feet first. Never sled headfirst.
  • Before buying a sled, stop to consider who will be using it. If it’s a sled for one adult, you might choose one that’s a little more adventurous than if you’re buying a sled for a child. If you plan to ride with a child or another adult, check the weight capacity and look for one that’s a little longer.
  • Many sleds have handles on either side. This is designed to give you some control over the direction of the sled. You can grip these and shift your body to steer.
  • Toting your sled back up the hill after reaching the bottom is a large part of the process. Consider that when choosing a sled. A heavier option will weigh you down on that journey and maybe even tire you out faster. Some come with a rope that makes pulling the sled up the hill a little easier.
  • Any equipment you use for playing in the snow needs to be dried out before storing it. You can clean them using soap and water, then set them in an area of your garage where they’ll be out of the way.
  • Sleds often come in a variety of colors. A brighter color could help it stand out in the snow, making it easier to find.
  • If you want a little more comfort for your snow-day adventures, look for a sled with padding on the seat. This can be especially useful if you spend hours sledding.