Southern Cypress Furniture Handmade Porch Swing With Cupholders, 5-Feet

Last updated date: May 18, 2020

DWYM Score
9.2

Southern Cypress Furniture Handmade Porch Swing With Cupholders, 5-Feet

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We looked at the top Porch Swings and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Porch Swing you should buy.

Overall Take

In our analysis of 93 expert reviews, the Southern Cypress Furniture Southern Cypress Furniture Handmade Porch Swing With Cupholders, 5-Feet placed 5th when we looked at the top 12 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note June 10, 2020:
Checkout The Best Porch Swing for a detailed review of all the top porch swings.

Expert Summarized Score
0.0
9 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
8.4
213 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
The design uses solid steel nuts and bolts alongside brass screws to create a solid and a very safe porch swing.
- Royal Hammock Headquarters
The contoured back avoids back pain while the cupholders mean that you won’t have to hold your drink all through.
- The Dear Lab
Solid wood construction
- The 9 Best
The drink holders are the perfect size for a bottle of beer, and you can use it for your smartphone too.
- Hanging Chairs
It is suited for heavy duty outdoor use.
- Top 10 Perfect
The sanded and rounded edges are on all slats with a contoured back and seat for comfort.
- Best Top Now
The seat is 5 feet long and rolled, comfortably seating 3 people or even more.
- The Patio Pro
​This product features brass-plated hardware whenever possible and solid steel bolts for extra durability, safety, and security when assembling and using it.
- Perfect Porch Swing
This particular wood is commonly known as “The Eternal Wood” because it is a very dense and naturally insect resistant wood that will be around for many years to come.
- Our Little Pages
What experts didn't like
Be cautious with the cup holders that come with. Using cups that are too small for it could cause you to spill something on the swing, thus causing it to stain.
- Royal Hammock Headquarters
Has a lot of splinters
- The 9 Best
Well-made, but could use a little more strength in the frame.
- Best Top Now
​The chains are designed to thread through the arm rests, making it difficult to actually use the arm rests when the swing is assembled.
- Perfect Porch Swing

From The Manufacturer

Southern Cypress offers the finest handmade cypress porch swings available. Handmade in the USA for over 13 years, all of our furniture is crafted from select 99% knot free cypress lumber. We only use brass plated screws and solid steel hardware. Cypress wood has long been known for its durable characteristics that make it ideal for interior and exterior use. This particular wood is known as “The Eternal Wood” because it is a very dense and naturally insect resistant wood that will be around for years to come. Cypress generates cypressene, a natural preservative oil, making the heartwood naturally resistant to insects, decay, chemical corrosion and other damaging elements. As such, Cypress remains one of the favorite wood choices for demanding outdoor applications such as fence posts, telephone poles, pilings, docks, railroad ties and of course furniture. Cypress is also a very stable wood, as it is highly resistant to splitting and warping. Dimensional stability ensures that the wood can readily accept paints and stains, although many people select cypress for the natural appeal of its honey-like hues, which can be maintained with a clear sealer or permitted to weather to a beautiful grey. Individually handcrafted in the USA. Select 99% knot free cypress. Can be assembled in 10-15 minutes. Back and seat come fully assembled. Back and seat nested with double bolts. Ready to be painted or stained (optional). No tailbone slat for extra comfort. Chains positioned to help prevent flipping. Staples are never used in assembly. Extra Wide Armrests for added comfort. Sanded & Rounded edges on all slats.

An Overview On Porch Swings

Is there any piece of furniture that says “lazy Sunday” more effectively than a good porch swing? For hundreds of years, they’ve been a staple on the most inviting porches. They’re beloved by all ages, from grandparents enjoying a morning coffee to toddlers on the lookout for a good swing (and even sleepy pets).

Before you consider buying a porch swing, take a good look at your porch. Size is going to be a big consideration, and you’ll want to make sure the swing isn’t too wide for the space. Once you’ve measured the dimensions of your space, take a look overhead. While most outdoor porches are built with enough support to handle a swing, that isn’t always the case. Look for a load-bearing ceiling beam, and when in doubt, consult with your builders.

Don’t have a secure ceiling or any ceiling at all? You’re not necessarily out of luck. Some swings come with their own support structure, although this type usually requires a little more space. Some types even come with their own covering to protect you from the elements, giving you that porch swing feel without the need for an actual porch.

Next up, take a look at the materials. Ideally, you’re going to want a porch swing that will last as long as the porch itself. Cheap swings might give you a few months of leisure, but they can rot in inclement weather and get unappealing very quickly — or dangerously insecure.

If you live in a California climate, you might be able to make do with some form of softwood like pine or cedar. Swings made from this type of wood can be very comfortable and have a great look to them, but make sure they’re treated with some type of weather-resistant coating. Even light rains can eventually wear down this type of wood.

Hardwood like oak or acacia will give you a classic look while being a bit more resistant to harsh weather. You should still make sure the wood is treated, but these materials will scratch less and are harder to dent. They’re also heavier, making them less prone to move around on high winds. (It may be a concern for hanging on lighter structures, however.) No matter what type of wood you choose, you’ll probably have to re-varnish it periodically to keep up its looks. Check the product specs for proper care procedures.

On the other side of the weight spectrum is wicker. This material has a distinctive look that matches the look of older houses perfectly. Older wicker chairs can be subject to fraying or chipping, but there are newer resin wicker chairs that can stand up to weather and regular use much more effectively. Either way, they’re very light, which makes them ideal for less windy areas or thinner ceilings.

If you’re less concerned about an “authentic” look, recycled plastic chairs offer a very good mix of durability and style. Depending on how well they’re constructed, they can pass for painted wood at a distance, and they’re much more resistant to the elements. In most cases, you can simply wipe them clean with a cloth periodically — no weather treatment required.

Finally, there are metal porch swings made of aluminum or wrought iron. Needless to say, you’ll want to buy cushions for this type of swing if they’re not already provided. For defense against dents and scratching, it’s hard to beat this material, though you may want to go for a bit of extra rust-proofing in especially harsh climates.

Now, what about the size? The default porch swing can handle two people, which means it will be from 3 to 5 feet in length. If space is a concern, there are 2-foot chairs available for solo swinging. If you want to bring the whole family aboard, look for a swing at least 6 feet in length (and a porch with the structure to accommodate it).

DWYM Fun Fact

The front porch feels like a uniquely American part of the home, and for the most part, it is. They came to be a part of many homes in the 19th century and were a popular place for neighbors to gather until the presence of sewers and traffic outside the front of the house made them less popular after the 1920s. Today, they’ve made somewhat of a comeback in rural homes as communities are planned with an eye towards engagement and openness.

The Porch Swing Buying Guide

  • As with any outdoor furniture, maintenance is going to be important. If you hear squeaks or sense any tilting, check for loose bolts or weak links in the support chain. Many hardware stores or swing manufacturers can provide you with replacement materials on both.
  • Wood swings will need a little extra TLC. Painted swings can easily be restored with a fresh coat, but make sure its a weather-safe type that will bond to the wood type. Teak, cedar and other softwoods can be treated with sealants that preserve its natural color, but use a treatment that’s designed for your swing. Teak oil and other varnishes that work well for indoor fixtures can hamper the production of natural oils in your wood, making it less resistant to mildew.