Sony Alpha a6000 Compact DSLR Camera

Last updated: October 13, 2023

Sony Alpha a6000 Compact DSLR Camera

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We looked at the top DSLR Cameras and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best DSLR Camera you should buy.

Overall Take

Need to take pictures of your kids on the soccer field? Go with this DSLR camera, which shoots 11 frames per second. The camera has built-in Wi-Fi, which means it also allows for instantly sharing your favorite pictures using your smartphone.

In our analysis of 118 expert reviews, the Sony Alpha a6000 Compact DSLR Camera placed 3rd when we looked at the top 19 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Test the limits of your creativity with the advanced mirror less camera and lens bundle that’s focused on speed and clarity. Every artistic shot you take-from candid’s to fast-action-benefits from 24.3MP detail and the world’s fastest autofocus. For capturing crucial moments that go by in a blink, the a6000 can shoot 11 frames per second. With a convenient OLED viewfinder, built-in Wi-Fi and compact size, it’s easy to use too.

Expert Reviews


What experts liked

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Our Expert Consultant

Jay Soriano   
Portrait photographer

Jay Soriano a headshot and portrait photographer in Las Vegas.

Overview

At one time, you couldn’t get the same high-quality picture with a digital camera as you could with traditional, film-based cameras. But DSLR cameras changed all that, providing high-quality, professional results without the need to go through the process of developing prints. This allows professional photographers to service the many customers who now prefer digital files to paper-based photos. It also lets amateurs refine their photography skills without the cost of film developing.

But if you’re in the market for a DSLR camera, be prepared to spend some money. Top-notch DSLR cameras can cost in the thousands, making it tough for hobbyists to make room in their budget. However, you can find a DSLR camera for a few hundred dollars, so it’s important to go into your shopping trip knowing exactly what features you’ll need. When setting your budget for a new DSLR camera, always be sure to factor in additional costs for a lens, says Jay Soriano, a portrait photographer based in Las Vegas.

First up is image quality, which is likely a top consideration, no matter how advanced your photography skills are. A bad camera can make it tough to provide images that have that “wow” factor, even if you have all the skills. There are multiple things that factor into whether a camera shoots well, though, including the lenses you use and the build of the camera itself. Little things, like whether your camera can shoot higher-quality images when lighting isn’t ideal, can make a big difference.

Whether you’re a professional photographer or someone still learning your trade, there are times when you’ll want to rely on autofocus. It can especially come in handy with action shots, where you don’t have an abundance of time.

Another important factor with action shots is whether or not your camera supports continuous shooting. The faster your camera can grab images at sports games, live performances or even red carpet events, the less likely you’ll miss that all-important shot. This is measured in frames per second, and the top cameras are all in a similar range. However, if you’re comparing two cameras and all other features are equal, frames per second can tip the scales.

If you plan to shoot outdoors even occasionally, you may want to consider your camera’s level of weather resistance. Some cameras are built specifically to withstand the rain and debris that you’ll at least occasionally encounter on outdoor shoots. A camera with that feature can come in handy over the years.

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