Sangde Easy-Way Cruiser Complete Skateboard, 31-Inch

Last updated date: August 10, 2022

DWYM Score

9.4

Sangde Easy-Way Cruiser Complete Skateboard, 31-Inch

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We looked at the top Skateboards and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Skateboard you should buy.

Update as August 10, 2022:
Checkout The Best Skateboards for a detailed review of all the top skateboards.

Overall Take

For those just starting out, the board is the one to launch with. The wheels have just the right amount of "give" to ensure a smooth ride. The trucks can stand up to some punishment and the board itself provides a firm surface with just a little bend.


In our analysis of 32 expert reviews, the Sangde Easy-Way Cruiser Complete Skateboard, 31-Inch placed 1st when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

The 53mm 95A PU wheels and ABEC-11 high speed with Strong Grip stainless alloy bearings makes skateboard stable,safe and easy to skate, Fit all kinds of roads. 5 inch aluminum trucks with PU damping make skateboard riding more comfortable. The skateboard deck is a 7 layer hardwood maple construction, it is high toughness and much more stable. Non-Slip Grip Tape and heat transfer are waterproof ,High Friction Easy operate all kinds of Play Style , Anti-slip for Safety skating. Double Warped Support More Strength Pressure Easy Operate, Easy to Give Power Allow Kick More Height More Advanced Skate Tricks Such as Sharp Turns, Pivots ,Slides and Street Skating.

Expert Reviews

User Summarized Score

9.0
3,612 user reviews

What experts liked

Shock-absorbing wheels are perfect for beginners
- Everything Mom
Long-lasting print and robust aluminum alloy trucks
- Concrete Wave
Durable with a tool pack and backup bearings for replacement.
- Skatetownguide

What experts didn't like

Not suitable for more advanced tricks and flips
- Everything Mom
Might be a too big skateboard for 3 year old
- Concrete Wave
Provides limitations for anybody past the beginner level.
- Skatetownguide

An Overview On Skateboards

When it comes to modes of transportation, the motorcycle might be cool. The bicycle might be practical. But there’s only one way to get around that’s cool, practical and cheap – and that’s a skateboard. Skateboarding has been around for decades now, and pro skaters can debate endlessly about what goes into a perfect board. If you’re just getting around to buying your first one, though, you don’t really need to worry about custom components or expensive trucks. Just knowing a little bit about the anatomy of a skateboard will help you pick the right one.

First things first: The board itself. The actual surface that you stand on is also known as the deck, and one size definitely does not fit all. Most decks are somewhere between 28 to 32 inches long (anything longer is a longboard, which is a type of board best left to experienced riders). But really, it’s the width that matters. The very youngest first-time skaters (those under 6 years old) will do best with a deck around 6 1/2″ wide. Older kids and tweens can size up to boards with a width of 7″ to 7 1/2″. Decks that are 8″ or larger are classified as full-size adult decks, and how wide you want to go depends largely on your shoe size. Ideally, you want your toes and heels to hang very slightly off the edge of the deck. Too much, and you’ll have trouble with balance. Too little, and you may have trouble turning.

As for materials, most decks are made of treated and layered maple wood. You can get boards made from carbon fiber or a host of other trendy metals, but most skaters agree that 7-layer maple has just the right amount of “give” and durability. Over the top of that, you should usually have a layer of griptape, which is a gritty surface that lets your feet stay put on the board.

The next thing you want to look at are the wheels. Skateboard wheels are almost universally made of polyurethane, but they can come in a wide variety of sizes. About 52 mm is standard, but you can get bigger wheels that will give beginners a little more stability. Just know that if you get wheels that are too much bigger, you’re going to need higher trucks — more on that later.

The hardness of your wheels also matter. Softer wheels are popular with newcomers to skateboarding, and they do offer a smoother ride. You can even get ultra-soft wheels that are specifically meant for riding on rough terrain. Smooth wheels are less prone to slide, though, and that can make many skateboard tricks impossible. Harder wheels are not only more durable, they’ll be more forgiving and reliable when it comes time to start doing kick-flips and other stunts.

Finally, there are the trucks. These are the brackets and axles that actually hold the wheels onto the skateboard, and loose or poorly mounted ones can be dangerous. Then there is the choice between high or low trucks, and that comes down to riding style. High trucks put the wheels a little farther from the deck, and they’re a must if those wheels are larger than standard. This configuration makes for a faster ride in general, and turning will be a lot easier for experienced riders. Lower trucks provide more stability, but make sure things don’t sit too low: If you turn too tightly, very low trucks can cause the deck to bite into the wheel, which will stop your ride in a hurry.

The Skateboard Buying Guide

Most starter skateboards will ride just fine with minimal care, but if you want to keep things in top condition there are a few things to know.

First, make sure you store your board in areas that aren’t too hot or too cold. Temperature extremes can cause your griptape to come loose, to name just one hazard. If that does start to happen, you can always clip down any parts that start to peel around the edge. If that short-term fix doesn’t work, use the hot air from a hair dryer to slowly melt the glue under the griptape and peel it away. Then apply a new layer of tape as soon as possible.

Every six months or so, you may also want to clean the bearings. Bearings let your wheels roll freely, and they can get clogged up with dust over time. Use some skateboard tools to disassemble the axle and it’s a simple matter to clear out that gunk by soaking the bearings in nail polish remover.