Nintendo New 2DS XL

Last updated date: March 27, 2019

DWYM Score

8.3

Nintendo New 2DS XL

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We looked at the top Video Game Consoles and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Video Game Console you should buy.

Update as August 26, 2019:
Checkout The Best Video Game Console for a detailed review of all the top video game consoles.

Overall Take


In our analysis of 88 expert reviews, the Nintendo New 2DS XL placed 7th when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

"Gamers of all ages can play in style with the New Nintendo 2DS XL system. It gives you the power of the New Nintendo 3DS XL system in a streamlined, affordable package-and plays a huge library of games in 2D. Colorful accents add style, while the sleek clamshell design makes it comfortable to hold and helps to keep screens safe from scratches when closed. A fast processor offers short loading times, so you can start playing in a snap. And it's all in a lightweight, play-anywhere package. The C Stick brings enhanced controls (like intuitive camera control) to compatible games, while ZL and ZR buttons give you plenty of options. Tap an amiibo figure to the near-field communication (NFC) reader on the lower screen to enjoy amiibo features in compatible games. You can play all Nintendo 3DS, New Nintendo 3DS and most Nintendo DS games in 2D on this system. Compared to Nintendo 2DS systems.

Expert Reviews

Expert Summarized Score

7.9
9 expert reviews

User Summarized Score

9.2
1,211 user reviews

What experts liked

Overall, the New 2DS XL is a beautiful device, with a nice ridged texture on its top side that makes it feel quite premium.
- Tech Radar
January 11, 2019 | Full review
The biggest draw of the New 2DS XL is the game library
- New York Times Wirecutter
July 27, 2018 | Full review
It features the faster processing power of the flagship Nintendo New 3DS XL, but without the glasses-free 3-D screen, saving you $50.
- Wired
September 3, 2017 | Full review
The matte plastic finish and raised ridging on the top side feel better and cleaner than the glossy pearlescence of previous generations.
- CNET
July 28, 2017 | Full review
What the name doesn’t tell you is that the New Nintendo 2DS XL has easily the most appealing design of any “3DS” released to date.
- The Verge
July 19, 2017 | Full review
Despite the smaller size, the 2DS XL feels roomier.
- Engadget
July 14, 2017 | Full review
Still, if you don't already own a 3DS or simply can't plunk down $300 for a new console, the New Nintendo 2DS XL is a fantastic and affordable entry point into one of the best game libraries of all time.
- Tom's Guide
July 26, 2017 | Full review
It packs all of the New 3DS features into a well-designed package with a very attractive price tag.
- PC Magazine
July 11, 2017 | Full review
The 2DS XL has one other defining feature that isn’t telegraphed by its name: it’s clamshell shape.
- Digital Trends
August 4, 2017 | Full review

What experts didn't like

While the New Nintendo 2DS XL's screen resolution might fail to blow people away in an age where HD resolutions are expected as a bare minimum, it stops mattering so much when you start playing the many classic games available in the 3DS library.
- Tech Radar
January 11, 2019 | Full review
Battery life can be a little weak, and I find most 3DS and 2DS systems can get around 6 hours of play depending on settings.
- Wired
September 3, 2017 | Full review
It means the difference between comfortably holding the stylus as you would a pen or needing to use some sort of cramped, arcane, twisted claw gesture on a stylus made for ants.
- CNET
July 28, 2017 | Full review
Most disappointingly, the screens are still awful TN panels.
- The Verge
July 19, 2017 | Full review
If the 2DS XL has a real fault, it's battery life.
- Engadget
July 14, 2017 | Full review
The one drawback to the New 2DS XL design is its fairly bulky hinge, which now houses the system's front-facing camera (why Nintendo's handheld still has a blurry 480p selfie cam, I don't know).
- Tom's Guide
July 26, 2017 | Full review
Like on the New 3DS and New 3DS XL, the nub feels very stiff, and isn't precise enough for aiming in an action game, but it's useful for camera controls and other activities that don't need a delicate touch.
- PC Magazine
July 11, 2017 | Full review
When jostled, the top of the console wiggles in a way that doesn’t affect your ability to play, but is unsettling.
- Digital Trends
August 4, 2017 | Full review

Overall Product Rankings

Xbox One X 1TB Console

2. Xbox One X 1TB Console

Overall Score: 8.8
Nintendo Super NES Classic

3. Nintendo Super NES Classic

Overall Score: 8.6
Nintendo Switch

5. Nintendo Switch

Overall Score: 8.6
Xbox One S 500GB Console

6. Xbox One S 500GB Console

Overall Score: 8.6
Nintendo New 2DS XL

7. Nintendo New 2DS XL

Overall Score: 8.3
Nintendo New 3DS XL

8. Nintendo New 3DS XL

Overall Score: 8.2
Nintendo 2DS

9. Nintendo 2DS

Overall Score: 8.1
Playstation Classic Console

10. Playstation Classic Console

Overall Score: 6.4

An Overview On Video Game Consoles

In the market for a new video game console? If you’re buying it for a savvy gamer, let us save you some time right now: Just ask them which one they want. While the console wars are intense between the three major companies (Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo), they’ve managed to keep their products fairly distinct so far. Currently, each company’s system has a rabid fanbase that loves their hardware and games for completely different reasons — and none of them are wrong. It’s about entertainment, after all, and there are more ways to capture someone’s imagination than fantastic graphics and sound.

That said, let’s start by explaining graphics capability quickly. All video game consoles display their games on your existing television by hooking up to it via HDMI or AV cable — although some devices can also display games on their own screen. The processing power of a console has a lot to do with how those games look when they’re displayed on your TV, though it can have just as much to do with the individual game you’re playing. The graphics capability of the TV itself also plays a factor. If graphics is your benchmark for quality, the PS4 Pro and Xbox One X are far and away the best options. But to truly see the difference, you’re going to need to use them with a TV with 4K capability — preferably one that also has HDR (high dynamic range).

Got one? Great. Both the PS4 Pro and Xbox One X are going to be able to take full advantage of all that resolution. In terms of raw power, the Xbox One X might have a slight advantage here with its 6-teraflop AMD processor and 12 gigabytes of GDDR5 RAM. For those who we lost after the word “teraflop,” allow us to translate: Games on this system look great and run smooth. For that matter, so do the ones on the PS4 Pro. Both systems can even “upscale” older games that were made to display in 1080p resolution, essentially filling in pixels to approximate 4K. And when these systems are running on all cylinders, which is to say playing games that were made in native 4K on an HDR screen, the results are beautiful. That said, graphics capability is reaching a bit of an event horizon. If you’re sitting 10 feet away from a 70″ TV, you might not even notice a difference between the quality in 4K display versus 1080p.

Luckily, graphics are just one feature of a video game system, and they don’t necessarily make the games more fun. Hardcore gamers tend to buy systems based on the games that are available to play. While most games are cross-platform (meaning they can be played on multiple consoles), there are a few exclusive titles that can only be played on certain systems. The PS4 Pro boasts tentpole exclusives, like “Spider-Man” and “God of War.” The Xbox has “Forza Motorsport 7” and “Gears of War 4.” The retro Super NES comes pre-loaded with “Mega Man X,” “Final Fantasy III” and 19 other classic games.

Speaking of Nintendo, both of its primary consoles have a very distinct appeal. The Super NES Classic features the most games bundled with any of the four major systems: 21 ports of titles that hooked gamers back on the original Super NES. For retro gamers, this is a huge value, and the console comes party-ready with two controllers.

The cost of games on these systems varies, from $60 for brand new titles down to $5 or so for some used or indie games. Increasingly, these can be bought in digital format on the console’s online store, so you never have to leave the house — provided your rig has enough storage. (This is a particular highlight for the 1TB PS4 Pro and Xbox One X.) And if you’ve got games from older versions of these systems, like the PS3 or Xbox 360? You can still play many of them on the Xbox One X. While the PS4 Pro isn’t as compatible with older discs, you can buy upgraded versions of its older titles on the PlayStation Store.

The Video Game Console Buying Guide

  • Most of the systems spotlighted here won’t come with games you can play right out of the box, although there are bundles that do include some popular titles for an additional cost. The exception is the Super NES Classic, which is possibly the most user-friendly console. It comes pre-loaded with 21 games from Nintendo’s golden age, including “Super Punch-Out!!” and “The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.” While you can’t buy additional games for that self-contained system, those titles should keep any retro fan busy for years.
  • Game prices vary for the rest of the systems, ranging greatly in price. You can buy physical game discs (or game cards, in the case of some devices) or download them digitally through each console’s online store. Bear in mind that storing the games this way takes up more storage space. Both the PS4 Pro and Xbox One X pack 1 TB of space for new games and save data. In all cases, upgrades are available.
  • Exclusive games are a big draw for any console, and for many, it’s the main reason to buy. Popular titles that are only playable on the Xbox One X include “Gears of War 4,” “Halo: The Master Chief Collection,” “Forza Horizon 4,” “Forza Motorsport 7” and “Sea of Thieves.”
  • PS4 Pro exclusives include highlights like “God of War,” “Bloodborne,” “Detroit: Become Human,” “The Last of Us,” “Spider-Man” and “Horizon: Zero Dawn.”
  • Once again, consider the TV you own before buying the more graphics-intensive systems (PS4 Pro or Xbox One X). If your television doesn’t have 4K capability, you won’t be able to take full advantage of the console’s main feature.
  • Most homes these days have some form of internet package, but it’s worth noting that it will probably figure into your gaming experience. Apart from the Super NES Classic, all modern consoles incorporate online functionality to some degree. In most cases, you’ll have to sign up for a gaming profile and online membership that will allow you to buy anything from movies to games to enhancements for your existing games. Some games, such as multiplayer shooters, are not even playable offline.
  • Game interface is another frequently overlooked part of the experience. If you’ve played extensively on previous versions of any of these consoles, you probably have a favorite controller. PS controllers tend to be slimmer while those for the Xbox have a fuller, heavier feel. And many gamers still swear by the simple, two-button elegance of the Super NES.
  • The PS4 Pro is a powerful piece of hardware, and you can use them to do much more than just play games. On all three, you can download movies, music or apps, and watch your favorite shows through Netflix, Hulu and YouTube. If physical media is still your thing, you can watch Blu-Ray discs on the Xbox One X, although movie-watching on the PS4 is limited to downloads or streaming.