Lodge Cast Iron Combo Cookware, 3.2 Qt

Last updated: November 17, 2021

Lodge Cast Iron Combo Cookware, 3.2 Qt

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We looked at the top Cast Iron Cookware and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Cast Iron Cookware you should buy.

Overall Take

This set offers great value as it gives you the option of using a shallow frying pan or a deeper skillet to suit the needs of your meal. The deeper 3-quart pot has the potential to make larger volumes of food, such as gravy, or it can hold homemade biscuits as they bake in the oven. The shallow pan will make frying and browning things a breeze.

In our analysis of 115 expert reviews, the Lodge Cast Iron Combo Cookware, 3.2 Qt placed 3rd when we looked at the top 18 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Sear, fry, bake, sauté or stir fry your meal indoors or at the campsite with the super-convenient Combo Cooker from Lodge®. This pre-seasoned piece features a cast iron construction that ensures food cooks slowly and evenly; it can be used as a large skillet or Dutch oven, and the lid doubles as a shallow skillet and griddle.

Expert Reviews


What experts liked

This Lodge cooking set is designed with thick and heavyset walls. Although adding to the overall weight, this feature has several advantages. The thick walls are excellent for retaining heat. What this means is that you’ll require less heat to cook your meals. It also means that your meals will remain warm longer. The thick walls also help to keep food from scorching if it’s being cooked on a high heat source such as open fire.
You’ll not only get a skillet for frying chicken, cooking steaks, or heating up your veggies and side dishes, you’ll also get a 3-quart Dutch oven for making your biggest and tastiest meals.
The sturdy handle comes with a reliable hole so that you can hang both the Dutch oven and the skillet when you’re not using them.
You can use the shallow pan as a lid for the other, or you can keep them separate for simultaneous cooking.
The company designed it for use on induction cooktops, stoves, grill and ovens alike. This cookware will outlast so many others in your kitchen. In fact, it has even been described to be brutally tough.
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This set does not have any chemical or synthetic coating and hence is safe for healthy cooking.
You don’t have to pay a good amount to take this combo cooker and pot since it comes at a very affordable price.
​This US-made product has excellent heat retention and cooks food evenly. It’s pre-seasoned so that you can use it immediately after purchase.

What experts didn't like

Not dishwasher safe.
The surface is rougher than pieces that have been machine-finished.
Prone to uneven heating
According to some users, it takes a little more time to reach the hot temperature.
Rough surface can cause food to stick.

Our Expert Consultant

Julie Chernoff
Culinary Expert

Julie Chernoff is a long-time member of Les Dames d’Escoffier (past president of the Chicago Chapter, and current co-chair of the LDEI Legacy Awards Committee), the Association of Food Journalists (AFJ) and the International Association of Culinary Professionals.

Chernoff is the dining editor of Better, a lifestyle website and print magazine. Her journalism started in the test kitchens of Weight Watchers Magazine. She holds a BA in English from Yale University and is a graduate of the California Culinary Academy. She has spent the last few decades styling, photographing, teaching, developing recipes, editing, thinking and writing about food.

Overview

When you find yourself needing a new pot or pan to step up your cooking game, the best cookware options in your favorite store will offer quite a number of potential solutions. There are white ceramic pans or thin pans that heat up instantly and claim to dissipate your heat perfectly for your needs. But keep browsing this pan selection and you’ll end up staring at a section of heavy-duty black pots and pans that you swear you’ve seen at your grandparent’s house before. Cast iron cookware is one of the most loved and longest-standing nonstick cooking options that exist. There are numerous reasons why they are regarded so highly, so we will break down some of the key points for you and help guide you towards the best style for your needs.

“There’s a good reason that these pans have been around so long — they work beautifully,” says our resident culinary expert Julie Chernoff, member of Les Dames d’Escoffier, dining editor of Better magazine and food journalist. “They are heavy enough to heat evenly and retain heat, they’re reasonably priced, and they are virtually indestructible.”

The construction of cast iron cookware is very sturdy as it is made as one solid piece of the metal and generally has no other material bolted onto it. Pick one up, and you’ll notice it’s heavier than most other pans due to this thick iron makeup. The thickness of the iron captures the heat coming from the flame or stovetop and slowly passes it on o the other side where the food is. If you were to place a thick skillet on the stove, crank the heat up to high and place a couple of eggs into the pan, the pan would slowly heat up and start firming the egg whites — but without burning them, as would likely happen in a thinner pan. That’s because the cast iron makeup is much more efficient with using and retaining heat.

If a skillet is too shallow for the big pot of chili you might be making for an autumn tailgate, try using something with more depth. Look for one that comes with a lid that helps keep the heat and steam in while the food simmers so all the flavors get to know each other in the pot.

But what about scorching and having food get stuck to the pan? As mentioned above, cast iron really is a non-stick cooking surface — once it is seasoned.

“Look for pre-seasoned pans as a timesaver, because the seasoning process can take a while,” Chernoff says.

All Lodge brand cast iron cookware comes with a coating of 100% vegetable oil on them. This oil is referred to as “seasoning” for cast iron. The oil creates a barrier between your food and the iron and creates a non-stick atmosphere while you’re cooking. The seasoning is a crucial part of getting the best results out of your cast iron cookware.

Cast iron cookware will last for many generations and often gets passed down as a rite of passage to the new cooks in the family. The stories that surround this cookware throughout its lifetime are surely some of the biggest selling points on using cast iron, and it’s something you’ll have to experience for yourself to fully understand. But you still have a big decision to make when you see that there are multiple sizes and shapes of cast iron cookware.

One category is a skillet that is used mainly as a frying pan. It has a deep enough profile to hold a healthy portion of vegetables, rice, pasta or meats that you want to sautee while still being shallow enough to let you get the spatula in for a clean flip on your over-easy eggs. It boasts a multifunctional size and shape that becomes a daily workhorse in most kitchens.

If you’re working on large stews or even roasting whole chickens, a 7-quart Dutch oven holds the largest volume of anything. When filled up with delicious ingredients, it can be the perfect size for feeding large families or meal prepping on Sunday to make the week a little easier for those of us on the go.

As you’re shopping for cast iron cookware, definitely consider the handles.

“Cast iron is heavy, so the handles are especially important, especially in the larger skillets,” Chernoff explains. “One long handle will be unwieldy. Having the ‘helper handle’ opposite the long handle allows the weight to be evenly distributed when carried.”

Cast iron cookware is not dishwasher-safe, so if that is important to you, you’ll want to consider other options. Also, these pots and pans should not air dry, as they may rust. Do not use metal scouring pads on them; once they are cleaned, they should be dried and oiled immediately. Although you must be careful of these elements, cast iron is great for home cooks.

“These pans really are incredibly versatile, from pancakes to deep frying and everything in between, and can easily go from stovetop to oven, as they are safe at almost any temperature,” Chernoff points out. “And unlike non-stick cookware, you can use metal utensils on the surface, as they will not damage it.”

Simply take care of your cast iron cookware, and it’ll perform for you!

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