Hasbro Battleship Strategy Board Game

Last updated date: May 3, 2021

DWYM Score

9.0

Hasbro Battleship Strategy Board Game

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We looked at the top Board Games For Kids 7 & Up and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Board Game For Kids 7 & Up you should buy.

Update as May 3, 2021:
Checkout The Best Board Games For Kids 7 & Up for a detailed review of all the top board games for kids 7 & up.

Overall Take

This update adds planes to the classic Battleship fleet. The gameplay is the same, though: Try to guess where your opponent's ships are while hiding your own. Young kids will enjoy the tension and maybe even learn how to read a simple graph as they play.


In our analysis, the Hasbro Hasbro Battleship Strategy Board Game placed 6th when we looked at the top 7 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

This exclusive edition of the Battleship game includes 2 planes in addition to ships, for exciting aircraft combat. In head to head battle, players search for the enemy’s fleet of ships and aircraft, and destroy them one by one. With convenient portable battle cases and realistic looking naval crafts and planes, the Battleship game puts players right in the middle of the action. Each player announces the coordinates of each strike, and then hopes that it hits. Position ships strategically to survive opponent's relentless strikes, and track hits and misses with red and white pegs on the ocean grid. No ship or aircraft is safe in this game of stealth and suspense. Hasbro gaming and all related terms are a trademark of Hasbro.

An Overview On Board Games For Kids 7 & Up

The grade school years hold a lot of milestones for kids. Not only are they learning essential skills such as math and reading, but they’re also growing even faster socially and testing out ways to interact with kids their own age.

While they’ll do the bulk of this learning at school, there’s an easy way you can help them with all of the above. Game night can be a great way to help kids develop a wide range of talents and an even better way to keep you connected with your kids.

Of course, we’re not talking video games here. They can be great in moderation, but board games offer a way to get the whole family involved — if you can pick the right game. When you have a wide range of ages in the household, that’s not always easy.

Every parent wants their kids’ fun to be mixed with a bit of education, but don’t worry too much about that aspect when it comes to very young kids. Even a game of pure luck like “Candy Land” or “Chutes & Ladders” can help your child develop emotionally as they learn the concepts of fair play and sportsmanship (not to mention simple counting skills). First and foremost, you’ll want a game that is easy to set up and learn so that your young opponents don’t lose interest before the game has even begun. And while lots of shiny and colorful game pieces can attract their attention, they can also get lost easily. Board games these days can be pricey, and you don’t want your first game to be your last.

As kids get older, you can focus on games that might teach a specific skill, but they don’t have to be explicitly “educational.” Competition can bring out the best in kids if it’s properly directed. Kids will actually want to learn their numbers if it helps them beat Mom at “Uno,” for instance, or start reading better once they have deciphered those “Monopoly” cards for themselves.

To ensure that kids are involved, let them pick out the games that you buy or play on any given night. Remember, what they play isn’t as important as the fact that they’re playing at all.

The Board Game For Kids 7 & Up Buying Guide

Watching your kids win a board game might be fun, but the flip side of that coin might mean pouting at best and a tantrum at worst. Most child psychologists say that you should take the good with the bad and let your child lose. If it’s handled properly (i.e., without gloating), letting your kids deal with a tough loss teaches them resilience — and that rules in life (or in “The Game of Life”) really matter.