Final Fantasy 7: Crisis Core

Last updated date: July 3, 2019

DWYM Score
8.9

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We looked at the top 1 Sony PSP Games and dug through the reviews from 8 of the most popular review sites including Trusted Reviews, GameSpot, Games Radar, Den of Geek, Video Gamer, Pocket Gamer, Neoseeker and more. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Sony PSP Game you should buy.

Overall Take

The epic storyline in "Final Fantasy 7: Crisis Core" makes this a worthy addition to the pantheon of fan-favorite RPGs. The visuals are beautiful, both in gameplay and in the well-acted cutscenes. The combat system is a hybrid of real-time and turn-based tactics, easy for any newcomer to pick up. In our analysis of 93 expert reviews, the Square Enix Final Fantasy 7: Crisis Core placed 2nd when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note August 12, 2019:
Checkout The Best Sony PSP Game for a detailed review of all the top sony psp games.

Expert Summarized Score
8.5
8 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
9.3
418 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
FFVII changed this overnight, with an incredible combination of gorgeous 3D visuals, cinematic presentation and the deepest, richest story console gamers had ever seen.
- Trusted Reviews
February 5, 2011 | Full review
However, this is one of those cases where you should embrace them for their originality and charm because they add something uniquely compelling to the game.
- GameSpot
March 25, 2008 | Full review
In-game cutscenes are also fantastic with detailed character models and finely crafted facial expressions again reminiscent of the style we've seen in Kingdom Hearts -- but more refined.
- IGN
March 8, 2008 | Full review
It’s fast, easy, addictive and perfectly suited to a portable experience.
- Games Radar
March 19, 2008 | Full review
Crisis Core is an eminently professional production: you don’t mind about the odd cheesy line of dialogue because the voice acting, music and graphics are so good – especially for the little PSP.
- Den of Geek
June 23, 2008 | Full review
Much of this is down to the addictive combat system, which combines real-time movement with traditional Final Fantasy turn-based attacks.
- Video Gamer
June 20, 2008 | Full review
The system works remarkably well. In fact, it's one of the best real-time combat systems so far conceived for a portable role-playing game because it so brilliantly works around the control constraints of the handheld.
- Pocket Gamer
April 4, 2008 | Full review
Crisis Core works great as a stand alone game, and it also is an awesome game, to fill in the rest of the Final Fantasy Story.
- Neoseeker
March 25, 2008 | Full review
What experts didn't like
Crisis Core won’t be 100 per cent what you’re looking for, but neither will it disappoint.
- Trusted Reviews
February 5, 2011 | Full review
Combat is on the easy side
- GameSpot
March 25, 2008 | Full review
The camera can often be very frustrating when trying to explore confined areas.
- IGN
March 8, 2008 | Full review
Knowing the main character and his girlfriend are doomed
- Games Radar
March 19, 2008 | Full review
The weak missions and lack of traditional RPG action may put off traditional role-players.
- Den of Geek
June 23, 2008 | Full review
The game isn't a complete bed of roses though. Zack can be pretty damn annoying at times, with his adolescent whining and emo issues grating, especially during the first half of the game.
- Video Gamer
June 20, 2008 | Full review
The only issue lies in the unpredictable camera, which can't be directed because there aren't any available buttons to do so when in battle.
- Pocket Gamer
April 4, 2008 | Full review
There really isn't too much wrong with this game, the only thing I had trouble with was certain parts of the story, but eventually those parts were explained through out the game, so I don't really have anything to complain about.
- Neoseeker
March 25, 2008 | Full review

From The Manufacturer

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII PSP

Overall Product Rankings

1. PlayStation Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep
Overall Score: 9.3
Expert Reviews: 11
2. Final Fantasy 7: Crisis Core
Overall Score: 8.9
Expert Reviews: 8
3. God of War: Ghost of Sparta
Overall Score: 8.8
Expert Reviews: 9
4. Final Fantasy IV The Complete Collection
Overall Score: 8.7
Expert Reviews: 9
5. God of War Chains of Olympus
Overall Score: 8.7
Expert Reviews: 9
6. Grand Theft Auto Vice City Stories
Overall Score: 8.7
Expert Reviews: 10
7. Metal Gear Solid Peace Walker
Overall Score: 8.6
Expert Reviews: 8
8. Daxter
Overall Score: 8.5
Expert Reviews: 9
9. Ratchet & Clank: Size Matters
Overall Score: 8.3
Expert Reviews: 8
10. Toy Story 3
Overall Score: 7.7
Expert Reviews: 4

An Overview On Sony PSP Games

The last edition of the PlayStation Portable (or PSP) was discontinued back in 2014, so to say that this system is past its heyday would be something of an understatement. But the early generation of PlayStation’s games are still some of its best, and many of them are playable on this handheld game console in some form. In a lot of ways, there’s been no better time to be a PSP gamer! For one thing, both the system and games can be found for just a fraction of what they cost when Sony’s flagship portable was released in the mid-2000s.

Back then, that sticker price was one of the main gripes against the PSP, but it was clearly worth it to the millions of gamers who bought one. The PSP was an early adopter of some the bells and whistles that are now commonplace to handheld systems like the Nintendo Switch, like the ability to play it on a television or monitor. And while they’ve stopped making games for it, the graphics hold up well on its 4.3 inch LCD screen.

Those games included nearly every genre there is: Action / adventure (“God of War: Ghost of Sparta,” “Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories”), role-playing (“Final Fantasy 7,” “Kingdom Hearts”), racing (“Ridge Racer,” “Need for Speed: Underground Rivals”), sports (“NFL Street 2: Unleashed”) and much more. While solo is the primary way most gamers play on the PSP, you can play with a friend on some designated multiplayer titles if they also have a PSP in the same room. Failing that, you can hook up to Wi-Fi through the system’s internet capability and find other players online. Just bear in mind that Sony’s online support for the PSP has been largely phased out, so the community of players you find online may be less than robust.

While we’re on the subject of online support, it’s helpful to know that Sony has also phased out the PlayStation Store on the PSP, where you would originally go to download games. Barring some inventive tech solutions, the only way you can play the PSP’s games now is on the primary media that it launched with: The UMD, or Universal Media Disc. But that’s not to say your options are limited! Over its lifetime, Sony and other big developers put out hundreds of titles for the PSP. They’re still out there for sale, used and new. And as has been said before, they’re still some of the best.

DYWM Fun Fact

Gamers praise the Nintendo Switch these days for its modular setup and versatility. The PSP wasn’t quite as well known for its non-game potential — at least, not officially. Hackers have found several inventive uses for old PSP consoles, modifying them into robot remotes or rudimentary smartphones.

The Sony PSP Game Buying Guide

  • When you’re buying a PSP game, consider the player. If that player is a young child, you might have to do a tiny bit of homework first. With its slick presentation and sharper graphics, the PSP was initially marketed toward an older crowd of gamers than the Nintendo DS, its primary competition at the time. That’s not to say that the PSP didn’t have games for younger kids. Titles like “Daxter” and “Little Big Planet” are not only some of the system’s top-selling games, they’re great fun, no matter what age you are. But there are more mature games whose violence level might be a concern for parents, such as “God of War: Ghost of Sparta” or “Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories.” When in doubt, check the ESRB (Entertainment Software Rating Board) box on the cover of any game. It’ll not only tell you what age range the game is suitable for, but also the reasons the game is rated that way (violence, language, etc.).
  • Do you plan on playing the game with others? Group play is a highlight of the gaming experience for many, but the PSP — being a handheld, portable device — caters slightly more toward the solo player. That’s not to say you can’t play select games with friends, but since online support for the system has been largely discontinued, your options are a bit more limited. For the most part, you’ll need another player physically present in the room with another PSP to connect to. This can be a particular concern if you’re buying sports games or one-on-one fighting games like “Darkstalkers Chronicle,” where multiplayer competition is a primary appeal.
  • A lot of parents buy games to occupy their kids on long car trips or to buy a little quiet time at restaurants. If that’s the case, consider whether the game needs the sound on to be playable. While it’s nice to hear the soundtrack on “Final Fantasy 7: Crisis Core,” that game and RPGs like it usually have subtitles for the dialogue. If a game really needs the sound up, maybe consider another option — or just invest in headphones, so your young player won’t bring the whole room into the game.
  • Another factor to consider is repeat playability. It’s great to binge-play an engrossing new game when you first get it out of the box. It’s not so great to be done the next day when you’ve played through the storyline and there’s nowhere else to go.
  • A word on the software: While you used to be able to download games and even movies through the PlayStation Store, that’s no longer the case now that Sony has phased out the PSP in favor of its newer handheld (the PS Vita). You can still play games on their primary physical format, the Universal Media Disc. That “universal” part is not to be taken at face value, though. Keep in mind that UMDs will work only in your PSP, and not in your larger PlayStation consoles or any other device.