Evenflo Advanced SensorSafe

Last updated date: August 25, 2021

DWYM Score

7.1

Evenflo Advanced SensorSafe

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We looked at the top Infant Car Seats and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Infant Car Seat you should buy.

Update as August 31, 2021:
Checkout The Best Infant Car Seat for a detailed review of all the top infant car seats.

Overall Take


In our analysis of 133 expert reviews, the Evenflo Advanced SensorSafe placed 14th when we looked at the top 20 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Introducing Evenflo's all new Platinum Protection Series - award-winning car seats that carry forward our passion for products that foster a safer, more peaceful ride. Evenflo continues to redefine industry standards with the new rollover tested line of Platinum Car Seats. The Evenflo Evolve 3-in-1 Combination seat features an innovative design allowing you to transition the seat between 3 different modes of use. This seat can be used as a harness booster, high back booster, & a no back booster. Sporty style elements appeal to children, as will the dual cup holders. The seat accommodates children ranging from 22-120 pounds. This combination seat provides an exceptional value for a seat with such a wide support range combined with an array of innovative features.At Evenflo, we continue to go above and beyond government standards to provide car seats that are 2X the Federal Crash Test Standard and Evenflo's Side Impact Test Standard. These seats have also been rollover tested. DO NOT lubricate or immerse in water any part of this child restraint, unless rinsing is permitted Plastic and metal parts may be wiped clean with mild soap and water and dried with a soft cloth. Do not use abrasive cleaners or solvents.Care and Cleaning -Take care not to damage any labels. The harness can be wiped clean with mild soap and water. Allow harness to air dry. Machine wash the seat pad separately in cold water, delicate cycle. Tumble dry 10 to 15 minutes on low heat. Periodically inspect and clean the restraint's crotch buckle of food, liquids, and other debris to ensure proper latching. Place the buckle in a cup of warm water and gently agitate the buckle back and forth. Press the red button several times while the buckle is in the water. Do not submerge the harness strap. To avoid damage to the buckle, do not clean the buckle with soap or detergents and do not use a lubricant.

Expert Reviews

Expert Summarized Score

6.5
6 expert reviews

User Summarized Score

8.3
43 user reviews

What experts liked

Excellent labels and instructions Lighter weight carrier Adjustable crotch strap SensorSafe chest clip
- Consumer Reports
A sensor chest clip on the five-point harness works together with a plug-in receiver for your car. When you turn off the ignition, an alert sounds twice to remind you about your child
- The Bump
When vehicle is turned off, a series of tones will immediately remind driver the driver that there is a child buckled in the carseat.
- Car Seat Blog
March 9, 2017 | Full review
It will also alert the caregiver if the chest clip becomes unbuckled during the trip.
- Car Seats For The Littles.org
April 6, 2017 | Full review
The sensorsafe feature for the car seat dings every time I turn my car off or the car seat straps are opened while the car is in motion. I love this feature.
- Baby List
It's worth seeking out because of its low price, high weight/height limits.
- Baby Center

What experts didn't like

Crash protection Handle position and clearance requirements can limit room in some cars
- Consumer Reports
If the tone could to be turned off or over ridden then the technology would not be very effective to insure the baby was safe and out of the heat.
- Car Seat Blog
March 9, 2017 | Full review
I gave it four stars because the stroller is difficult to close. We have to use our key to push the tiny buttons in to get the stroller to close.
- Baby List

Our Expert Consultant

Dr. Niket Sonpal   
Gastroenterologist and adjunct assistant professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine

Dr. Niket Sonpal is an adjunct assistant professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine and clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn, who specializes in gastroenterology.

He is a graduate of the Medical University of Silesia-Hope Medical Institute in Poland. After completing his residency in internal medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital, he was selected to be the 2013‐2014 Chief Resident at Lenox Hill Hospital–Northshore LIJ Health System. Dr. Sonpal completed his fellowship in gastroenterology and hepatology at Lenox Hill Hospital and continues his work in the field of medical-student and resident-test preparation. He now serves as the associate program director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Brookdale University medical center.

He is also the co‐author of several medical test prep books and serves as the chief operating officer for Medquest Test Prep and director of medical education for Picmonic Test Prep.

Overall Product Rankings

An Overview On Infant Car Seats

You’re probably already nervous about your first ride home with your tiny bundle of joy. On top of that, you have to try to pick the best infant car seat from a seemingly endless array of options. From the ease of installation to fabric comfort and whether or not it works with your stroller system, it can be overwhelming, to say the least. It’s simple to break down the basics of what you need in an infant car seat so you can find the right infant car seat for your growing family.

Take your time before making a purchase, as this is a significant investment in your baby’s safety.

“This is one of the most important purchases a parent will ever make,” says Dr. Niket Sonpal, a doctor based in New York City.  “This is not the time to seek out a budget item. Buying quality can literally save your infant’s life.”

Infant car seats — sometimes called bucket or pumpkin seats — are rear-facing and made for infants and toddlers up to two years old. The height and weight requirements vary from seat to seat but they typically work for babies from around 4 to 35 pounds and up to 32 inches in height. Some seats, like the Chicco KeyFit 30, are preferred for preemies but only go up to 30 pounds and 30 inches. The seat usually clicks into or attaches to a base that stays in the car.

Many infant car seats have a carrying handle and an adjustable shade. They also have various types of cushions and inserts that can be used for the smallest infants and then taken out as your child grows.

Experts recommend that children stay rear-facing at least until two years old or when they reach the height and weight limit for the seat. According to the federal government, using a car seat reduces the risk of injury in a car crash by 71 to 82%. Overall, kids may end up using a car seat or booster up to the age of 12, based on their height and weight.

Knowing that their child will be using a car seat for such a long time prompts many parents to opt for a convertible car seat. Unlike the infant car seat, a convertible car seat starts rear-facing and can change its configuration to a front-facing car seat and then finally a booster. They are just as safe as an infant car seat and must meet the same standards. While this option can certainly be budget-friendly and you may be able to keep your child rear-facing longer, there are some trade-offs.

For some, the biggest deal-breaker is giving up the ability to easily transfer a sleeping baby in and out of the car while still in the seat. Since convertible car seats are meant to stay in the car most of the time, they also don’t typically work with strollers and don’t have carry handles. And, since they’re larger to accommodate a growing child, they may not fit well in all vehicles. You’ll want to make sure to consider how you’ll be using the car seat and if it’s important for you to be able to keep your child in the car seat when you’re out and about. Many infant car seats work with a complimentary stroller or travel system and you may save money buying this as a package deal.

The most important part of any car seat purchase is safety. Each car seat uses different materials and features, but they all have to meet the same federal safety standards. Some may choose to do additional safety testing. There are a few things you’ll want to look out for, such as a five-point harness and a base that clearly indicates when the seat is attached and positioned correctly with a color change or a bubble level.

Actually installing and using the seat the right way can be stressful for any new parent, so the easier it is to do, the better. The government maintains an ease-of-use rating system to help parents find seats that have clear instructions and are easy to install and use. Anything rated 4 or 5 tends to be more intuitive.

Be sure to take the time to thoroughly and properly understand the installation instructions for your car seat, says Dr. Sonpal.

“A poorly installed seat leaves a child vulnerable in a crash,” he says.

All cars are now required to have a LATCH system (which stands for lower anchors and top tethers) that allows you to attach the car seat with clips near the seatbelt base and behind the headrest or seat. It can sometimes be a struggle to make the connectors the right length so a self-retracting option may be a major plus if you have to take the base in and out more frequently. 

Finally, it’s important to consider overall comfort, for you and for baby. Look at features like the weight of the car seat, the ergonomics of the carry handle and quality or type of fabric. Infant car seats can vary widely in weight. For example, one model may only weigh 16 pounds, while another weighs 25 pounds. That can make a big difference if you plan to tote the seat any distance with your little one inside.

If you live in a warm climate you may want to look for a cooler fabric, like breathable jersey. Moisture-wicking merino wool, which is also naturally flame retardant, is another good choice. While buying online can be the most cost-effective and convenient, you may want to go to a store where you can compare the feel of the fabric and other materials.

The Infant Car Seat Buying Guide

  • Any parent or caregiver who has cleaned a car seat mess will tell you how important easy-to-clean fabric is. Even better, look for car seats that allow you to remove the lining or pad entirely and toss it in the washer.
  • If you travel frequently or live in a city where you may need to use your car seat in a taxi or rideshare you may want to opt for an infant car seat that can be used with or without its included base, giving you more flexibility when on the go.
  • You are not alone when it comes to learning how to install a car seat properly. The federal government offers free car seat inspection locations (usually at local fire stations) with trained technicians who can show you how to install it and use it.
  • Believe it or not, car seats expire. That’s why it’s not recommended to purchase a car seat from a yard sale or online reseller or reuse one from a friend. Most infant car seats expire in five to six years. Some convertible car seats last up to 10 years. You may be able to find the expiration date on the car seat itself or in the owners’ manual. If you can’t find a date, note the model number and call the manufacturer. Most car seats do end up looking kind of beat up, but the real risk is caused by plastic getting hot and cold repeatedly over the years. This may cause hairline cracks or brittleness that aren’t easy to see, and are very dangerous in a crash.
  • Once you’ve chosen the perfect seat, you also have to make sure you’re strapping in your little one correctly. Straps should be at or below the shoulder without any looseness or slack. Your child may protest but you should only be able to fit a couple fingers behind the strap. The chest clip should be at armpit level in the middle of the sternum. If it’s too high, it could cause neck injury and if it’s too low, your child could be thrown from the car seat.
  • As an added safety precaution you can add a luggage tag or label to the side of the seat with emergency contact info. Include details like your child’s name, parents’ name, address and phone numbers, pediatrician name and any medical conditions. This way, first responders can find valuable information quickly, in case the parent or caregiver is injured or unable to speak.