Duco UV Protecting Men’s Polarized Sunglasses

Last updated date: May 13, 2022

DWYM Score

9.3

Duco UV Protecting Men’s Polarized Sunglasses

Why Trust DWYM?

DWYM is your trusted product review source. Along with our in-house experts, our team analyzes thousands of product reviews from the most trusted websites. We then create one easy-to-understand review. Learn more.

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval
Look for the DWYM seal for products that are the best in the category.
Show Contents

We looked at the top Men's Polarized Sunglasses and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Men's Polarized Sunglasses you should buy.

Update as May 13, 2022:
Checkout The Best Men’s Polarized Sunglasses for a detailed review of all the top men's polarized sunglasses.

Overall Take

What makes these men's polarized sunglasses unique is their resin lenses. This type of lens features several layers that protect against the sun's UV rays, wind pressure and scratches. Of course, the luxurious look of the glasses is also a plus.


In our analysis, the Duco Duco UV Protecting Men’s Polarized Sunglasses placed 2nd when we looked at the top 9 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Polarized sunglasses have been popular for years with boaters and fishermen who need to reduce reflected glare from the water surrounding them.But now that many others who spend time outdoors have discovered the benefits of polarized lenses,interest in these types of sunglasses has soared.Besides boaters,outdoor enthusiasts who benefit the most from polarized sunglasses include skiers,bikes,golfers and joggers,all who may enjoy a clearer view along with elimination of glare.These sunglasses can be used for driving and ,in fact,can reduce glare from a long,flat surface such as the hood of the car or the road’s surface.Polarized sunglasses also can be worn indoors by light-sensitive people,including post-cataract surgery patients and those continually exposed to bring light through windows.

Expert Reviews

User Summarized Score

8.6
9,799 user reviews

What experts liked

What experts didn't like

An Overview On Men's Polarized Sunglasses

If you’re choosing polarized sunglasses, you want your eyes to be protected in high-glare situations such as when you’re on the water or in the snow.  Polarized sunglasses have a chemical applied to them that absorbs horizontal light waves (reflections) while allowing in vertical ones (direct light). Thus, the light you see is a touch darker, but is also crisper and more detailed.

When choosing polarized sunglasses, you’ll want to consider the tint color of the lens, the optical and physical properties of the lens (distortion, scratch-resistance), whether or not the lens has coatings (such as anti-reflective), and the amount of light the lens lets in. If the sunglasses list a protection index number, you want at least a category 2.

Choosing a pair of polarized sunglasses online can be challenging because you can’t try them on. However, you can work around that challenge with a little research. A website that sells glasses will offer information to help you determine what frames look best on your face shape, and some may offer virtual tools to assist in that process.

However, you shouldn’t feel constrained to what experts say will flatter your face shape. Most glasses frames can look good on anyone, and you shouldn’t limit yourself if you prefer something different.

You’ll also want to factor in price. All polarized sunglasses will offer adequate UV protection, but more expensive ones might have better materials and higher quality overall. They may offer a better visual experience and last longer — but, if you lose sunglasses easily, such advantages may not matter.

The Men's Polarized Sunglasses Buying Guide

  • Not all ultraviolet rays from the sun are the same. Likewise, not all items meant to protect you against UV rays are the same. You want sunglasses that will block out both UV-A and UV-B rays.
  • UV-A is similar to blacklight. It’s what causes tanning, but also results in premature aging to skin and damage to skin cells.
  • UV-B is a small but dangerous portion of natural sunlight, and can cause eye strain and sunburn. It is thought to be the main culprit behind skin cancer.
  • UV-C light is absorbed by the ozone layer, so it does not threaten us. Humans use it as a disinfectant.
  • UV-A and UV-B light can, over time, lead to macular degeneration, cataracts, pterygium, and temporary blindness if eyes aren’t protected.
  • Some sunglasses come with a UV number, such as UV400. UV400 glasses block UV rays all the way up to 400 nanometers, protecting you from almost 100% of UV light.
  • Watch for lenses advertised as “polarized” which actually aren’t. You can test a pair of sunglasses by looking at a shiny horizontal surface through them, then turning them 90 degrees to the side. If the lens is polarized correctly, the surface’s glare should reduce quite a bit without blotching.