Dremel MM50-01 Multi-Max Tool-LESS Accessory Change Oscillating Multi-Tool

Last updated date: June 1, 2020

DWYM Score

9.0

Dremel MM50-01 Multi-Max Tool-LESS Accessory Change Oscillating Multi-Tool

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We looked at the top Oscillating Multi-Tools and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Oscillating Multi-Tool you should buy.

Editor's Note June 24, 2020:
Checkout The Best Oscillating Multi-Tool for a detailed review of all the top oscillating multi-tools.

Overall Take


In our analysis of 14 expert reviews, the Dremel Dremel MM50-01 Multi-Max Tool-LESS Accessory Change Oscillating Multi-Tool placed 6th when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

The Dremel Multi-Max mm50 oscillating tool is equipped with a powerful 5. 0 amp motor, The highest amp rated tool at the $129 price point. It is also built with a robust metal head that lowers vibration for cleaner precise results with less fatigue, as well as increasing tool durability. The innovative design with the compact head and angled body makes it easier to get into tight hard-to-reach spaces and gives you much better control, especially when flush or plunge cutting. Twist and push the knob for quick, simple and tool-less blade Change. Includes 30 accessories and a carry on bag for you to get started right away. It's the smoothest, smallest, Smartest and strongest in its class. Experience the evolution of innovation with The new Dremel mm50!

Expert Reviews

Expert Summarized Score

8.8
2 expert reviews

User Summarized Score

9.3
348 user reviews

What experts liked

It has a more combat head that is around thirty percent smaller than other tools in the same range, which enables you to reach into tighter spaces than what other tools are able to. Its angel’s body provides a new and improved user experience, especially when it comes to needing a flush cut.
- Lumber Ace
The Dremel Multi-Max MM50 introduces a more powerful 5.0A motor along with an angled design that's genuinely helpful and an update to their tool-free blade clamp.
- Pro Tool Reviews

What experts didn't like

I have a little concern about the long-term knob durability and accessory compatibility.
- Pro Tool Reviews

An Overview On Oscillating Multi-Tools

Walk into any hardware store and you’re likely to see aisles full of specialized tools for all manner of home improvement jobs. There are sanders, grout removal tools, vinyl strippers and electric blades of various sizes and shapes depending on what they’re meant to be cutting. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was one tool that could handle all of these jobs?

Savvy handymen know that there already is. It’s called the oscillating multi-tool, and although it’s only been a staple in the contractor’s tool chest for the past decade or so, many home repair specialists now wouldn’t dream of tackling a job without one.

So what does it do? As the “multi-tool” name implies, there isn’t much it can’t do. The basic design of this handheld device incorporates a motor that can move a blade (or any one of several accessories) in a rapid side-to-side motion. That motion is known as oscillation, and it’s well suited to portable cutting devices. Unlike circular saws and other comparable tools, oscillating cutters tend to “grab” less and are easier to handle for detail jobs.

As with any interchangeable bladed tool, a secure fit is key. Many older tools might require an allen wrench or some proprietary accessory in order to remove the old blade and sub in a new one. Newer models typically have some lever system such as Bosch’s Starlock that allows users to change accessories on the fly without unscrewing.

As with any power tool, the big attraction for most buyers is going to be the power. A good general measure of that power is the motor’s maximum oscillations per minute, typically abbreviated as OPM. Any decent multi-tool should have that number listed prominently, but it’s hardly the only measure of quality. If you’re doing light-duty jobs like drywall cutting or sanding, you might not even need all that much torque. In that case, you might look for a multi-tool with variable settings that be adjusted down. Less OPM might not cut through masonry so well, but it will make your tool easier to handle for detail work.

The next big factor is portability. If you need to tackle jobs in multiple areas of the house on the same day, you might want to invest in a cordless multi-tool. The battery will need to be recharged periodically, but there have been great strides in lithium-ion battery technology in the last few years. You can expect plenty of use out of a charge on most mid-range or better tools.

Corded multi-tools, of course, will only have a range as long as their cord. That’s fine as long you’re working indoors, or in reasonable range of an outlet — but you will want to be wary of cutting through your own cord or other mishaps in messy work areas. That said, corded multi-tools are generally able to squeeze a bit more power out of their motors. The results may vary, and might be negligible if you’re not doing consistently heavy work. Still, every little bit counts.

Most multi-tools will come in a kit with an array of fittings and blades suited to a variety of jobs. There are blades for grout removal, drywall, concrete and more plus various sizes of sanding pads, to name just a few. You may not need all of them, so pick the kit that suits your work the best. Still, if you’re just starting out in home repair you might want to grab a larger bundle. After all, why have a multi-tool if you’re going to limit its uses?

The Oscillating Multi-Tool Buying Guide

Buying new accessories for your multi-tool is fairly easy, and can even be fun. Still, check your manufacturer’s guide for details. Many multi-tools have adapters that will allow them to use blades and pads from other brands. Others are somewhat more proprietary with their gear. Whatever you do, make sure the fit is secure no matter what head you use. Operating a tool with a loose blade can result in harm to the blade, the tool — and possibly the user.