Clinton Romesha Red Platoon: A True Story of American Valor

Last updated date: June 27, 2019

DWYM Score
8.8

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We looked at the top 1 Military Books and dug through the reviews from 6 of the most popular review sites including Good Reads, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews, Conservative Book Club, The Worthy House, The Truth About Guns and more. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Military Book you should buy.

Overall Take

In our analysis of 50 expert reviews, the Clinton Romesha Clinton Romesha Red Platoon: A True Story of American Valor placed 7th when we looked at the top 11 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note July 8, 2019:
Checkout The Best Military Book for a detailed review of all the top military books.

Expert Summarized Score
9.5
6 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
9.8
1,317 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
This ranks among the best combat narratives written in recent decades, revealing Romesha as a brave and skilled soldier as well as a gifted writer. He supports his own memories with hours of interviews and official reports to describe the battle and its context.
- Publishers Weekly
April 4, 2016 | Full review
The book is riveting in its authentic detail, right down to the determined attempts to recover American bodies before the Taliban could. Romesha ably captures the daily dangers faced by these courageous American soldiers in Afghanistan.
- Kirkus Reviews
The battle, from start to finish, is riveting. I felt invested in these fighters, from the first death to the attempts to save one soldier who had had his legs blown off. Romesha, using both his memories and those of his fellow soldiers, constructs the scenes skillfully. It’s great writing, and he manages to make a battle that lasted 14 hours credibly stretch for most of the book.
- Conservative Book Club
Most of the book is a blow-by-blow description of the battle as it evolved. It is engrossing and compelling. The descriptions are well written, and the inside cover has a very helpful isometric drawing of the base, so it is possible to closely follow the battle and to imagine oneself there.
- The Worthy House
December 7, 2017 | Full review
As someone who has never been in the military, I was able to understand the terminology, the tactics, and the situation that everyone in Keating found themselves in that day. Romesha’s writing style is informative and straightforward, yet also vivid and highly entertaining. He writes in a way that’s relatable to both servicemen and civilians alike.
- The Truth About Guns
September 5, 2016 | Full review
What experts didn't like
It’s not all perfect, though. The telling is, or nearly so, but the substance, upon examination, has problems, mostly relating to Romesha’s treatment of other soldiers. The author is fond of crisply denigrating numerous other members of his troop, both of his own platoon and even more of the other two platoons.
- The Worthy House
December 7, 2017 | Full review

From The Manufacturer

Former Staff Sergeant Clinton L. Romesha enlisted in the Army in 1999. He deployed twice to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and once to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. At the time of the deadly attack on Combat Outpost (COP) Keating on October 3, 2009, Staff Sergeant Romesha was assigned as a section leader for Bravo Troop, 3-61st Cavalry, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. He is the recipient of numerous awards and decorations, including the Medal of Honor, which has been received by only twelve others for the heroism they displayed while serving in Iraq or Afghanistan. Romesha separated from the Army in 2011. He lives with his family in North Dakota.

An Overview On Military Books

For those who are interested in learning more about wars, military books provide excitement and intrigue. Military books can cover a range of topics from strategy to technology to heroes. Military warfare is a complex and far-reaching topic, as are the books that cover it.

Non-fiction military books provide the story of real-life events that have taken place. Historical military books cover militaries and wars from long ago, such as those of ancient Greece and Rome or the Chinese Empire. Modern-day non-fiction military books cover wars that have happened more recently, such as World War I and World War II, in addition to the Iraq war and many others. The goal of most non-fiction military books is to provide the reader with a factual account of the role of the military event event the is covering. They may look at both sides involved in the war or focus on just one side. Some non-fiction books follow the life of a particular person who played a pivotal role in the actions of the military.

Fiction military books, on the other hand, cover imaginary events. Those events may be inspired by real-life wars and people, but the narrative is constructed and certain liberties are often taken in terms of what actually happened during the war itself. Fictional military books often have a central hero character who carries the weight of saving the world on their shoulders.

Many military books can be quite graphic when describing the battle. This may include detailed descriptions of injuries and deaths that take place during the fight, so keep this in mind when selecting a military book to read — especially if you are squeamish around blood.

In both non-fiction and fiction military books, the stakes are life and death, so emotion plays a key role. Readers become invested in the fate of certain characters, real or fictional, and it can be heartbreaking when they perish. While the overall plot of military books focuses on the war or the battle, the central characters are what captures the readers’ attention. It is the human element that makes military books so captivating.

DYWM Fun Fact

Recorded military history is not a new phenomenon. In fact, it goes back all the way to 1479  BCE. The first armed battle that was recorded by actual eye-witnesses was the Battle of Megiddo, which was between Thutmose III of Egypt and an alliance under the King of Kadesh. Long before that even, in 2700 BCE, was the first war in history as we know it. The Sumerians and Elamites battled it out together in a legendary war.

While not as old, the United States also has a storied military history. The start of the American military wasn’t with professional soldiers, however. It was civilians that made up local militias in the 1600s, protecting their villages from neighboring European colonies and Native Americans. It wasn’t until 1775 when the Continental Army, the predecessor to the United States Army, was founded.

The Military Book Buying Guide

  • Before selecting a military book to read, it’s important to look at the plot of the book to pick one that resonates with your interests. Mark Sullivan’s “Beneath a Scarlet Sky” is a fictional story set during the time of World War II. It follows an Italian teenager as he helps Jews escape over the alps as part of an underground railroad. In the process, he falls in love with an older widow. “13 Hours” by Mitchell Zuckoff is a true account of what took place at the Battle of Benghazi on September 11, 2012. It follows the six American security officers as they go beyond the call of duty. Sean Parnell’s “Outlaw Platoon” is the author’s personal account of the bravery of the U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division and their efforts against insurgents in the mountains of Afghanistan. “The Forgotten 500” by Gregory A. Freeman is the previously classified true story of the 500 American soldiers that were trapped behind enemy lines in Nazi-occupied Yugoslavia during World War II. The story focuses on the men’s perseverance and their incredible never-before-told rescue by Allied Forces.
  • For many readers, the author of each military books plays an important role in the purchasing decision. Certain authors have a particular style of storytelling that readers love, while others bring a unique perspective to the military events taking place in the book. “Beneath a Scarlet Sky” author Mark Sullivan is an award-winning author of over a dozen books, as well as a career investigative journalist. He also writes a bestselling series with world-renowned author James Patterson. On the other hand, Mitchell Zuckoff, author of “13 Hours,” is a professor of journalism and the author of six other non-fiction books. Sean Parnell, author of “Outlaw Platoon,” was a U.S. Army Ranger who was promoted to a commander of a 40-man elite infantry platoon. He writes about his first-hand accounts. Gregory A. Freeman, author of “The Forgotten 500,”  is an award-winning narrative non-fiction author with more than 25 years of journalism experience.
  • The awards a military book has won is an important factor when deciding which one to read. If a book has won critical acclaim or reached the top of the bestseller list, then you know many others have read and enjoyed it. Mark Sullivan’s “Beneath a Scarlet Sky” is a Goodreads Choice Award Finalist for Historical Fiction and a 2017 Goodreads Top 20 Most-Read Book. On the other hand, Sean Parnell’s “Outlaw Platoon” is a New York Times Bestseller.
  • The length of the book may affect whether or not you want to read it. Sometimes, people want a long and detailed book to delve into night after night, whereas other times you want a short and quick read you can get through on a lazy weekend. Mark Sullivan’s “Beneath a Scarlet Sky” runs over 520 pages, whereas “13 Hours” by Mitchell Zuckoff is just over 320 pages. Sean Parnell’s “Outlaw Platoon” is over 410 pages, while “The Forgotten 500” by Gregory A. Freeman is under 340 pages.
  • For many readers, the price of the military book plays a role in the purchasing decision. Mark Sullivan’s “Beneath a Scarlet Sky,” “13 Hours” by Mitchell Zuckoff and Sean Parnell’s “Outlaw Platoon” are all available for under $10 in paperback format. On the other hand, “The Forgotten 500” by Gregory A. Freeman costs just under $15 for a paperback version.