Buffalo Games Logic Cards Brain Board Game For Kids 7 & Up

Last updated date: April 20, 2022

DWYM Score

9.6

Buffalo Games Logic Cards Brain Board Game For Kids 7 & Up

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Update as April 20, 2022:
Checkout The Best Board Games For Kids 7 & Up for a detailed review of all the top .

Overall Take

If your child loves a good mental challenge, then this board game for kids 7 and up is an excellent option. The game includes 128 cards with challenges to complete, a card holder, a game board, Game Board and six pawns. Players will need to complete puzzling and brain teasers in order to move across the board. The first to the finish line wins!


In our analysis, the Buffalo Games Buffalo Games Logic Cards Brain Board Game For Kids 7 & Up placed 1st when we looked at the top 9 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

Based on the Emmy-nominated National Geographic Channel TV series, Brain Games, Brain Games Kids takes players through a series of challenges that puts both their mind and body to the test! Teams go head-to-head to test their logic, language, vision and physical coordination. It’s a great party game and perfect for family game nights! OBJECT OF THE GAME: Play as teams and work together to answer mind-bending challenges in this CEREBELLUM SHOWDOWN! The first team to reach the finish space wins! GAME CONTENTS: 128 Challenge Cards in 3 categories: – 48 Puzzling Pictures Cards – 48 Brain Benders Cards – 32 Body Language Cards 1 Card Holder 1 Game Board 6 Colored Pawns.

An Overview On

The grade school years hold a lot of milestones for kids. Not only are they learning essential skills such as math and reading, but they’re also growing even faster socially and testing out ways to interact with kids their own age.

While they’ll do the bulk of this learning at school, there’s an easy way you can help them with all of the above. Game night can be a great way to help kids develop a wide range of talents and an even better way to keep you connected with your kids.

Of course, we’re not talking video games here. They can be great in moderation, but board games offer a way to get the whole family involved — if you can pick the right game. When you have a wide range of ages in the household, that’s not always easy.

Every parent wants their kids’ fun to be mixed with a bit of education, but don’t worry too much about that aspect when it comes to very young kids. Even a game of pure luck like “Candy Land” or “Chutes & Ladders” can help your child develop emotionally as they learn the concepts of fair play and sportsmanship (not to mention simple counting skills). First and foremost, you’ll want a game that is easy to set up and learn so that your young opponents don’t lose interest before the game has even begun. And while lots of shiny and colorful game pieces can attract their attention, they can also get lost easily. Board games these days can be pricey, and you don’t want your first game to be your last.

As kids get older, you can focus on games that might teach a specific skill, but they don’t have to be explicitly “educational.” Competition can bring out the best in kids if it’s properly directed. Kids will actually want to learn their numbers if it helps them beat Mom at “Uno,” for instance, or start reading better once they have deciphered those “Monopoly” cards for themselves.

To ensure that kids are involved, let them pick out the games that you buy or play on any given night. Remember, what they play isn’t as important as the fact that they’re playing at all.

The Buying Guide

Watching your kids win a board game might be fun, but the flip side of that coin might mean pouting at best and a tantrum at worst. Most child psychologists say that you should take the good with the bad and let your child lose. If it’s handled properly (i.e., without gloating), letting your kids deal with a tough loss teaches them resilience — and that rules in life (or in “The Game of Life”) really matter.