AUKEY 10000mAh Slimline Power Bank Portable Charger

Last updated date: May 26, 2020

DWYM Score
9.2


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We looked at the top Power Banks and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Power Bank you should buy.

Overall Take

This option lets you power up your favorite device quickly on a high-speed 3.0 port. It is compatible with Apple or Android phones, and even can charge a Nintendo Switch. Charges can be done by USB-C or A. In our analysis of 35 expert reviews, the AUKEY AUKEY Slimline Power Bank Portable Charger placed 7th when we looked at the top 10 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

Editor's Note May 26, 2020:
Checkout The Best Power Bank for a detailed review of all the top power banks.

Expert Summarized Score
8.8
4 expert reviews
User Summarized Score
9.0
689 user reviews
Our Favorite Video Reviews
What experts liked
Features 3 charging ports which is rare for 10,000mAh power banks. Use two methods of recharging. Has a slim form factor that you can easily fit into a pocket.
- Charger Harbor
This portable smartphone charger from Aukey is just 14mm thick. It has three ports to charge your smartphones and other compatible devices. One of the ports is a USB-C port, which also serves as the power bank’s charging port, and the portable battery only takes 4 hours to fully charge.
- Audio Authority
It's packing a 10,000mAh battery that can deliver 18W of power to a mobile device.
- Android Police
The Aukey 10000mAh Power Bank With Power Delivery ($29.99) features a 10,000mAh battery, a USB-C port with Power Delivery, a USB-A port with Quick Charge 3.0, and a traditional 5V USB-A port. For such a large-capacity battery, it takes just four hours to recharge via USB-C with an 18W charging adapter.
- PC Magazine
What experts didn't like
Has a low max output.
- Charger Harbor
Unfortunately, that means you won't be able to power a laptop with this option, but given its size and portability, you'll likely just be using it to charge your phone anyway.
- Android Police

From The Manufacturer

Dual-Device Charging Charge two devices at once with 18W total output. Low-Current Charging Mode A special mode to charge low-current devices (below 60mA), such as bluetooth headphones and fitness trackers. Rapid Power Bank Refill Power Delivery 2.0 recharging via USB-C. Slimline Power Solution Keep your devices charged on-the-go with this compact 10000mAh power bank. Great feel in the hand or fit in the pocket with your phone. Slimline, lightweight unit; just 15mm / 0.59” thick and 245g / 8.64oz in weight. Fingerprint-resistant, matte black surface framed by a glossy rim with minimalist LED battery level indicator and power button positioned discreetly at one corner. Universal Charging Compatibility Charge all USB-powered devices including iPhones, Android phones, tablets, wireless headphones & speakers, and more. USB Power Delivery USB Power Delivery is a new, universal multi-voltage charging standard that dynamically negotiates power output over a USB Type-C connection to safely and efficiently recharge a wide range of compatible devices. Fast charge the new iPhone X, iPhone 8, or iPhone 8 Plus up to 50% in just 30 minutes. Or power a Nintendo Switch for 6 more hours of gameplay. Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 Engineered to refuel devices up to four times faster than conventional charging. Powered by INOV (Intelligent Negotiation for Optimum Voltage) Technology for fine-tuned power output and more optimized charging cycles. Up to 38% more efficient than Quick Charge 2.0. Backward-compatible with Quick Charge 2.0/1.0 devices. Specifications Model: PB-Y13 Battery Capacity: 10000mAh / 37Wh Micro-USB Input: DC 5V 2A USB-C Input (PD): DC 5V 1.5A, 9V 2A USB-C Output (PD): DC 5V 3A, 9V 2A, 12V 1.5A USB Output 1 (Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0): DC 5V–6V 3A, 6V–9V 2A, 9V–12V 1.5A USB Output 2 : DC 5V 2.4A Total Power Output: 18W Note: To fast charge any Samsung S9 or S10 model, use the power bank USB-C port and your own USB-C to C cable. The chip in these newer Samsung models only allows standard speed charging from the Quick Charge 3.0 port.

Overall Product Rankings

1. Anker 20100mAh PowerCore High Capacity Power Bank
Overall Score: 9.7
Expert Reviews: 4
2. INIU 10000mAh Ultra Slim Power Bank Portable Charger
Overall Score: 9.5
Expert Reviews: 4
3. ZMI 10000mAh PowerPack Power Bank Portable Charger
Overall Score: 9.4
Expert Reviews: 4
5. RLERON 25000mAh High Capacity Wireless LCD Power Bank
Overall Score: 9.3
Expert Reviews: 2
6. ROMOSS 30000mAh Power Bank Sense 8+ Power Bank
Overall Score: 9.2
Expert Reviews: 4
7. AUKEY 10000mAh Slimline Power Bank Portable Charger
Overall Score: 9.2
Expert Reviews: 4
8. CXLiy 26800mAh High Cpacity Power Bank Portable Charger
Overall Score: 9.1
Expert Reviews: 2
10. RAVPower 26800mAh RAVPower Power Bank
Overall Score: 9.1
Expert Reviews: 4

An Overview On Power Banks

Tablets. Smartphones. Smart watches. Laptops. We’ve got so much gear these days that sometimes we can forget that these devices need power — until that power gauge goes into the red. When that happens, you understand how essential a good power bank can be, especially if you’re on vacation or miles away from a convenient wall plug in the wild.

In situations like those, a good power bank can literally be a lifesaver. But exactly what are they? First, let’s talk about what they are not. While power banks can charge your phone or other devices, they are not technically chargers. Chargers are just conduits between your phone and a power source (typically a wall outlet). Power banks are the power source, packing an internal battery that your gadgets can hook up to and feed on.

Those internal batteries can be one of two types: Lithium-ion (usually listed as Li-Ion) or the less common lithium polymer (Li-Po).

Lithium-ion batteries were first developed in the early 1910s, and obviously they are still in common usage today — with several improvements to those first crude models. These batteries can pack a lot of power into a relatively small package, and they’re relatively cheap to produce. They’re not without their drawbacks, however. Lithium-ion batteries will degrade more easily over time, and can even be unstable — although that’s more likely to be the fault of the device and not the battery inside it. (For a prime example, look up the 2016 woes of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7).

Lithium polymer batteries, by comparison, are less likely to leak electrolytes and therefore a bit safer. They’re also lighter, more flexible and can be made much thinner. So why aren’t they the standard? Like most technology that’s smaller and sleeker, they are significantly more costly to make. Nor are they necessarily better, depending on your energy needs. In general, they can’t pack the same amount of power into as small of a space as lithium-ion, and their ability to recharge can degrade slightly over time.

Mind you, looking at the type of battery you have won’t tell you how much energy your power bank can supply. For that, you’ll have to look at the battery capacity, which is measured in mAh. That stands for milliamp hours, and it takes a bit of explaining. Milliamps are a unit of measurement for electric current equal to one-thousandth of an ampere. Milliamp hours will tell you the energy capacity of a battery by telling you how long your power bank can supply a certain amount of energy. In terms of charging up your phone, let’s say it has a battery capacity of 2,000 mAh. If you have a power bank with a battery capacity of 10,000 mAh, it could charge up your phone five times without needing a recharge itself. Simple division: 2,000 times 5.

Enjoy the practice, because you may want to do a little more easy math before shopping. Take a look at all your devices and add up their own battery capacity. That’s the number you’ll probably want as a minimum for your own power bank, provided you plan on charging multiple gadgets with it. The battery capacity for smartphones can vary wildly (especially among older models), but the current iPhone 11 has a capacity of over 3,000 mAh. The latest tablets have batteries that can hold from 5,000 to 9,000 mAh or more. Laptops understandably take a lot more power, so you’ll need a high-end power bank with at least 20,000 mAh if you want more than one full charge at a go.

That’s well and good, but capacity isn’t everything. When you’re on the go, sometimes you don’t have all night to charge up your gear. When you need to know how fast your power bank will deliver a charge, look at the output stats. They’ll be measured in two numbers: Volts (V) and amps (A). Without getting into the electrical weeds too much, these two numbers are multiplied together to get the full output possible, in watts (W). You’ll see proprietary fast-charging tech like Qualcomm’s Quick Charge advertised for certain devices, but those numbers are the bottom line. And bear in mind they may not be the rate at which your device actually charges: Speed is limited by the cable that you use to connect your phone or tablet to the power bank. If the power bank can deliver a charge at 5V / 3A but the cable is only capable of handling 5V / 1A, you’ll charge at the slower rate.

Of course, your power bank itself will eventually have to be recharged. Look for the input stats to get a sense of how fast it can get to a full charge when connected to a standard wall outlet.

So much for the interior stats. One feature that will be immediately obvious in your power bank is how many output ports it has. The more ports, the more devices you can charge simultaneously. Multiple ports might be a major attraction for multi-taskers who like to take all their gear on the go, but all ports are not created equal. USB-A ports will be standard, but there have been several upgrades to that standard over the years. Look for ones with USB 3.0 compatibility or higher, as they’ll be able to take advantage of higher speed cables.

Some power banks might be capable of wireless charging, and may even be able to do that while providing power to other devices through the USB ports. Just know that the power it puts out will be split between those devices and may not charge any of them as fast as it would solo.

Of course, all this functionality doesn’t mean much if your power bank weighs as much as a generator. Yes, modern power banks keep a relatively slim profile. Some may be as small as your smartphone itself, or even smaller. Heads up, though: they may be heavier than they look — even ones that have the slimmer lithium polymer batteries. Take a look at the weight before purchasing and figure that into your travel plans.

Speaking of travel benefits, many power banks can make themselves useful for more than just a passive charge. Some can use their batteries to power a flashlight in case of emergencies or will heat up just enough to become a makeshift pocket warmer in frigid weather. Those perks can make a lot of difference, and turn a forgotten backup device into a handy hiking buddy.

DWYM Fun Fact

While you’re watching that little bar fill up on your phone, say a quiet word of thanks to Alessandro Volta. He’s the French physicist and chemist who gave the world its first electric battery in 1800. Back then, it was known as a voltaic pile, composed of copper and zinc dipped in brine. His discovery was built on the experiments of colleague Luigi Galvani, who initially used frog’s legs to conduct current between two electrodes. As you might imagine, the term “volt” was coined in homage to Volta.

The Power Bank Buying Guide

  • So you’ve got your power bank. All set to take your gear on the road? Not so fast. Make sure you’ve got the charging cables to go with it. Strange as it may seem, many power banks won’t provide the connectors that actually attach their battery to the device it needs to charge. Check that you’ve got a cable to match the port type supplied on your power bank (ideally one that matches or exceeds the output speed).
  • Make sure you also charge up the power bank before you use it for the first time. Many banks will come with only a minimal charge right out of the box, in order to preserve the battery.
  • A good power bank can last for many years if it’s properly stored. Different models may boast of their durability, but no matter what the casing, lithium batteries and moisture do not mix. Keep it out of the rain for extended periods, or submersion in water. A more common pitfall is heat or cold. Your power bank will perform best at room temperature, and it definitely will suffer if left out in a hot car for days on end (or a poorly insulated one in winter, for that matter).