Amazon Kindle Voyage E-Reader

Last updated date: October 6, 2020

DWYM Score

8.2

Amazon Kindle Voyage E-Reader

Why Trust DWYM?

DWYM is your trusted product review source. Along with our in-house experts, our team analyzes thousands of product reviews from the most trusted websites. We then create one easy-to-understand review. Learn more.

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval
Look for the DWYM seal for products that are the best in the category.
Show Contents

We looked at the top E-Readers and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best E-Reader you should buy.

Update as June 14, 2021:
Checkout The Best E-Reader for a detailed review of all the top e-readers.

Overall Take


In our analysis of 95 expert reviews, the Amazon Kindle Voyage E-Reader placed 9th when we looked at the top 14 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

PagePress is a custom-designed force sensor made of carbon and silver, which reacts to a subtle increase of pressure, triggers a page-turn, and provides a haptic response only your thumb can perceive. Because PagePress has no moving parts, the haptics provide you with the most minimal indication that you have pressed the button, to reduce distraction from reading.

Expert Reviews

Expert Summarized Score

8.7
10 expert reviews

User Summarized Score

8.2
13,847 user reviews

What experts liked

A mid-range Kindle e reader thats slightly thinner and lighter than lower-end models.
- BestReviews
It has an improved lighting system, and its higher-resolution screen is a little sharper, with better contrast.
- CNET
The main thing to talk about here is the screen. Raised to level off with the bezel, Amazon has created an ereader that feels more design house than something you'd sling into a bag and hope doesn't break.
- Tech Radar
November 7, 2018 | Full review
Voyage has a 6-inch backlit touchscreen, but its screen is sharper and clearer.
- Trusted Reviews
February 5, 2018 | Full review
Flush, pixel-dense screen is the best we've seen on any e-reader
- Engadget
For me, the next biggest improvement is the texture of the Voyager’s glass. The Voyage’s glass is as smooth as the glass on any laptop or smartphone I’ve used, and there’s no transition between the bezel and the display.
- PC World
October 27, 2014 | Full review
It is light and easy to hold with one hand and the squeezable buttons are excellent.
- The Guardian
November 27, 2014 | Full review
The Voyage’s glass is as smooth as the glass on any laptop or smartphone I’ve used, and there’s no transition between the bezel and the display.
- TechHive
October 27, 2014 | Full review
The Voyage's front light is adaptive, so if you select the Auto Brightness setting, it will automatically adjust based on the light around you. I love this feature
- PG Magazine - SE Asia
July 6, 2017 | Full review
The amazing part of the device is that, you can run it for weeks without recharging (depends on your reading habits). In our test, it lasted for about 12 hours over Wi-Fi.
- PC Quest

What experts didn't like

It's a bit longer than the newly revamped Oasis.
- BestReviews
It's not a huge upgrade over the Kindle Paperwhite, but it costs considerably more. And you'll pay more still for a case, which isn't included.
- CNET
Sadly, these aren't perfect in design. The footprint you can hit is oddly thin, and I kept missing the button. It wasn't a hugely regular thing, and you'll probably adjust to not noticing it in the future
- Tech Radar
November 7, 2018 | Full review
As with most recent Kindles, the Voyage doesn’t have a headphone jack, so it doesn’t support audio books.
- Trusted Reviews
February 5, 2018 | Full review
High price tag means it just doesn't make sense for the average reader.
- Engadget
The only other significant criticism I can muster for the Kindle Voyage is to gripe about its price tag.
- PC World
October 27, 2014 | Full review
The problem is that the Voyage costs more than a decent Android tablet with much more functionality.
- The Guardian
November 27, 2014 | Full review
The only other significant criticism I can muster for the Kindle Voyage is to gripe about its price tag.
- TechHive
October 27, 2014 | Full review
No memory card slot or ePub support.
- PG Magazine - SE Asia
July 6, 2017 | Full review
The new device is a bit expensive, as there are no major upgrades than previous Paperwhite.
- PC Quest

Our Expert Consultant

Molly Thornberg   
Technology and parenting blogger

Molly Thornberg is a professional writer, creative and mom to four kids, living her best life outside of Dallas, Texas. With a love for all things tech, she is passionate about helping parents raise kids in the digital age. She writes about technology, parenting and humor on her blog Digital Mom Blog.

An Overview On E-Readers

E-readers have changed the way people consume books, magazines and articles. Instead of choosing between one or two physical books to bring with you on vacation, you can bring hundreds of options along in one sleek device. E-books tend to be cheaper than paperbacks, so it’s less expensive to expand your mind and check out new authors and titles. They’re also environmentally friendly; downloading e-books instead of buying hardcover books saves plenty of paper and cardboard.

The popularity of e-readers has spawned a large industry of digital reading devices, and finding the right one for your needs requires some research. One of the first questions you’ll want to ask yourself is how you plan to use your e-reader, and whether you might benefit from purchasing a tablet that can double as your e-reader, says technology expert Molly Thornberg, a parenting and tech blogger.

“Basic e-readers allow just reading. These are great for focused reading, and for kids,” says Thornberg, the brains behind the Digital Mom Blog. “More advanced e-readers are typically tablets offering more options like web browsing and a music player.”

Understanding the technology behind e-readers can also help you make your decision. E-readers take e-book files and make them accessible to readers by storing them on a small computer. Their optimized portability, readability and battery life make them great literary companions. Many models today are designed for easy reading in sunlight.

Staring at a computer screen to catch up on your reading list might sound like a headache, but e-reader technology reduces eye strain. Large screens, backlights and adjustable fonts and text sizes all make ebooks easier to read than ever.

Before you buy, you’ll want to consider whether you prefer an e-reader experience that closely mirrors the one you’d have with a regular book, or whether you’re up for a more lively display.

“E-readers offer either e-ink (electronic ink) or LCD display,” says Thornberg.  “E-ink offers an electronic paper-like display. LCD screen displays offer color and typically more touchscreen capabilities. Some devices offer both.”

Older e-readers needed to be charged regularly, but newer models have extended battery lives for more reading freedom. The Kindle Oasis can go weeks without a charge, so you won’t have to go hunting for power outlets at stops on your next road trip.

If audiobooks are more your speed, you can still listen to them on some e-readers. The Kindle Oasis and Waterproof Kindle Paperwhite are compatible with Audible, a massive library of audiobooks and original content.

You don’t need to worry about squinting to make out the words on your e-reader’s screen, either. The Pixels Per Inch (or PPI) of modern e-readers eclipses their predecessors.

Thornberg says you’ll also want to consider what e-book stores and libraries your new e-reader will have access to as well.

The E-Reader Buying Guide

  • Will you be traveling a lot with your e-reader? If you regularly jet set for work or play, you’ll want an ultra-portable e-reader that fits easily in a carry-on bag. 
  • How frequently do you plan on using your e-reader? All four of our top picks have improved battery life over their predecessors. They can go for “weeks” without a charge, but that’s dependent on how frequently you use them. Give your e-reader’s battery life a test run at home before you take it on any long trips.
  • E-readers can download books via WiFi or over your cellular network. Downloading over your home WiFi network will save you some cash, but you’ll be out of luck if you want to check out a new title on the go. Using a cellular network is convenient, but the data charges might drive up your cellular bill. Talk to your network provider before you dive into this option, and make sure you budget accordingly for your bookworm habit.
  • How many e-books, audiobooks and graphic novels do you plan on reading? You’ll need more memory if you want an extensive collection. The Kindle Oasis comes in 8 GB or 32 GB versions, while the Kobo Clara HD 6-Inch Touchscreen E-Reader comes with 8 GB of built-in memory.
  • What type of controls are you most comfortable with? Touchscreen controls are effortless. However, some older e-readers still use buttons to help you scroll through pages.