Acer Aspire TC-895-UA91 Desktop Computer

Last updated: October 14, 2020

Acer Aspire TC-895-UA91 Desktop Computer

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We looked at the top Desktop Computers and dug through the reviews from some of the most popular review sites. Through this analysis, we've determined the best Desktop Computer you should buy.

Overall Take

Unlike other desktop computers on the market, this one includes a keyboard and a mouse. It has a fast Intel Core i3 processor and extensive connectivity. Not only is it Wi-Fi and Bluetooth compatible, but it also has built-in USB, ethernet, audio and HDMI ports.

In our analysis of 51 expert reviews, the Acer Aspire Desktop Computer placed 1st when we looked at the top 12 products in the category. For the full ranking, see below.

From The Manufacturer

The Aspire TC is the perfect PC to tackle any task. From basic computing to multimedia entertainment, it’s a robust hub for your every computing need. Driven by an 10th Gen Intel Core i3 processor and 8GB of memory, this sophisticated black chassis design delivers plenty of speed, power and storage so you can play, create, do and enjoy more—all day, every day! Easily expandable and with remarkable performance, the Aspire TC Series desktop is the perfect partner when it comes to demanding tasks.

Expert Reviews


What experts liked

What experts didn't like

Our Expert Consultant

Patrick Ward 
Editor-in-chief of High Speed Experts

Patrick Ward is the editor-in-chief of High Speed Experts, a broadband connectivity-, search engine- and IT-industry education blog that empowers consumers by open-sourcing information about tech services. He earned his bachelor’s degree in commerce with an emphasis on communications at the University of Sydney. His expertise spans the digital, emerging tech and telecommunications fields.

Overview

The PC market has definitely shifted — today, you see more laptops and tablets in people’s homes than desktops.

“What used to be a staple of households, has now been taken over by the convenience and portability of laptops and tablets,” DWYM’s resident technology expert Patrick Ward, editor-in-chief of IT industry education platform and search engine blog High Speed Experts, says. “The key reason why you should buy a desktop over a laptop is simple: power.”

Desktops have come a long way over the years. You no longer need a large tower connected to a monitor. Instead, you can get peak performance from a small box tucked away in the corner of your desk. You also have the option of an all-in-one desktop, with the processing power packed into the display itself. These options free up your workspace, leaving plenty of room on your desk for stacks of forgotten reports and junk mail.

Don’t be fooled by the space savings, though. Technology companies have simply found a way to do far more in a smaller space. There’s a reason for that. Today’s applications require peak performance. You’ll need to search for a computer with the processing power to handle what you’ll be doing.

Playing games online specifically requires high-quality graphics and computing power, which makes desktops essential. More than that, they allow you to improve various elements without buying a whole new unit: “Not only can desktops be more powerful when you initially purchase them, they also can be upgraded with increased memory space and processing power,” says Ward.

One of the major components to consider is RAM, or random access memory.

“RAM speeds up your computer by storing real-time system information that you request,” Ward explains. “In other words, if you are using a video editing software or playing video games that make many requests a second, you’re going to want a lot of RAM. 8GB is the recommended minimum, but consider getting higher RAM if you’ll be running multiple programs at once (e.g. rendering a video while playing a video game).”

Next, you’ll want to explore storage capabilities. You’ll likely come across two main types of storage devices, internal hard-disk drives (HDD), and internal solid-state drives (SSD). An SSD can house 120-240GB, while an HDD holds 400GB-2TB. Many desktops will have both types of drive, but only need one.

“The generally accepted best practice is to place large media files on the HDD (videos, music, family photo albums) and essential programs, plus the operating system,” Ward says.

Video streaming quality is also a consideration. If you plan to stream video from your computer to a TV or large monitor, you’ll want to make sure you choose a computer with the power to handle the video resolution you desire. Some desktops have the graphics power to support high-definition displays. It’s important to look for this functionality upfront in case you’ll want it down the road.

No matter what your level of tech proficiency, setup can be a big consideration. Many all-in-one computers are designed to be put together quickly, so that may be a bonus. A kit is for those who want to put serious time into building a computer to be exactly how they want it.

Peripherals are also worth considering. Your all-in-one computers will probably come with a keyboard and mouse in the box, giving you everything you need to get started. However, these accessories aren’t typically of the highest quality, so if you’re picky about peripherals, you may end up replacing them anyway.

Lastly, there’s price. All-in-one pricing runs the gamut, but if you’re a gamer, you may find yourself paying more. For a bargain, you can’t go wrong with the Acer Aspire Desktop Computer. Just make sure you factor in the cost of a monitor. A kit setup requires so many add-ons, you’ll want to price everything before you make the decision to go that route.

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