Ford recalls 350,000 F-150s and Expeditions that can roll even when parked

Yikes! This is scary.

Courtesy Ford

Ford is recalling about 350,000 trucks for a problem that could cause them to roll even after the driver shifts into park.

The automaker says in a statement the issue affects 2018 Ford F-150 and Ford Expedition vehicles with 10-speed automatic transmissions, as well as Ford F-650 and F-750 vehicles with 6-speed automatic transmissions.

Ford says a piece of equipment on the affected vehicles can become dislodged over time, which means the car won’t be in the gear that it looks like it’s in, such as park.

This means that if the driver shifts the car into park, the car might not actually be in park — and there would not be a warning message to indicate that.

Getty Images

If he or she doesn’t use a parking brake, Ford says the vehicle could roll.

Ford says it’s aware of one reported accident and injury.

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This recall affects 292,909 vehicles in the United States, 51,742 in Canada and 2,774 in Mexico.

Here’s the full list of affected vehicles from Ford:

  • 2018 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Dearborn Assembly Plant, Jan. 5, 2017 to Feb. 16, 2018
  • 2018 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Kansas City Assembly Plant, Jan. 25, 2017 to Feb. 16, 2018
  • 2018 Ford Expedition vehicles built at Kentucky Truck Plant, April 3, 2017 to Jan. 30, 2018
  • 2018 Ford F-650 and F-750 vehicles built at Ohio Assembly Plant, April 25, 2017 to March 9, 2018

The New State Of The Art Ford Production Line
Getty Images | Carl Court

Missing Transmission Roll Pin

The company is also recalling more than 100 other vehicles for a missing transmission roll pin.

If the pin is missing, the company says that the transmission on those vehicles might eventually lose the ability to park, even if the driver shifts the car into that gear.

Ford Post 1 Billion Dollar Quarterly Profit
Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

Ford says that problem affects around 160 of the 2017 and 2018 Ford F-150s, 2018 Ford Expeditions, 2018 Lincoln Navigators and 2018 Ford Mustangs with 10R80 transmissions.

Here’s the full list of affected vehicles from Ford:

  • 2017-18 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Dearborn Assembly Plant, Oct. 20, 2016 to March 5, 2018
  • 2017-18 Ford F-150 vehicles built at Kansas City Assembly Plant, Dec. 22, 2017 to Feb. 26, 2018
  • 2018 Ford Expedition vehicles built at Kentucky Truck Plant, Nov. 28, 2017 to Feb. 14, 2018
  • 2018 Ford Mustang vehicles built at Flat Rock Assembly Plant, Nov. 6, 2017 to Feb. 12, 2018
  • 2018 Lincoln Navigator vehicles built at Kentucky Truck Plant, Dec. 13, 2017 to March 8, 2018

Wondering if your vehicle is affected by this or other recalls? You can use this handy tool from the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration to find out. Simply enter your vehicle’s vin number and you’ll be able to see if any recalls pop up.

Steering Wheel Recall

Unfortunately, this isn’t Ford’s first recall of 2018.

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Getty Images | Robert Cianflone

In March, the company announced that it was recalling 1.4 million vehicles because their steering wheels can become loose.

Some steering wheels even came off while the driver was operating the vehicle.

Courtesy Ford

Apparently, two accidents and one injury were potentially caused by this issue, according to Ford.

The affected models are the Ford Fusion and the Lincoln MKZ, both from model years 2014-2018.

Lincoln MKZ On Display At Los Angeles Auto Show, Press Day 2
Getty Images | Todd Oren

Models Affected

The steering wheel recall applies to every version of the Fusion:

-Fusion S
-Fusion SE
-Hybrid S
-Hybrid SE
-Hybrid Titanium
-Energi SE
-Energi Titanium
-Fusion Sport
-Fusion Platinum
-Fusion Hybrid Platinum
-Fusion Energi Platinum

The recall also applies to every version of the Lincoln MKZ:

-Lincoln MKZ Premier
-Lincoln MKZ Hybrid Premier
-Lincoln MKZ Black Label

Written by Jill Disis for CNN with additional reporting by Don’t Waste Your Money staff.

The-CNN-Wire
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