This map shows how much you have to earn to afford rent in every state

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You may have heard that you shouldn’t spend more than one-third of your income on rent.

In fact, some leasing offices will even check your pay stubs to make sure you’re not overextending yourself before you sign that lease. In theory, this is a great idea.

But this formula falls into the “easier said than done” category, because as rents continue to rise, salaries struggle to keep up.

Case in point: On average, an American household needs to earn at least $21.21 per hour to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment without spending more than 30 percent of their income on rent, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC).

But because location so heavily influences rental rates, there are some extremes.

For example, you’d have to earn almost $31 per hour in California to afford a two-bedroom rental, according to the map and study from the NLIHC that looked at rental rates in 2016.

On the lower end of the scale, you’d need to earn $14.49 per hour in West Virginia to afford a two-bedroom apartment.

National Low Income Housing Coalition

Here’s where things get tough. The federal government mandates a nationwide minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

To afford a one-bedroom rental unit, when factoring in the 30 percent rule, a renter would need to earn at least $17.14 per hour. That means she would need to work 94.5 hours per week.

In addition, the rental market is tight. Thirty-six percent of U.S. households opted to rent in 2015 — the largest share since the late 1960s, according to the most recent report from the Joint Center of Housing Studies at Harvard University.

The demand for low-cost rentals far exceeds the supply that’s available. Harvard cites a study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition that showed there were only 31 affordable rental units available for every 100 extremely low-income renters.

What You Need To Earn On A State-By-State Basis

Here is the hourly wage that a household must earn in order to afford the “fair market rent” for a two-bedroom rental unit without having to hand over more than 30 percent of their income.

These numbers assume you work for 40 hours a week and 52 weeks a year.

You can also check out this map, which shows how many hours per week minimum wage workers need to log in order to afford rent in a one-bedroom apartment. Some shockers? You’d have to work 124 hours per week in Hawaii, 106 in Maryland, 105 in New Jersey, and 101 in New York. (For context, each week contains 168 hours.)

RELATED: This map shows the largest bank in every state

National Low Income Housing Coalition

Where on the scale does your state stand?

Alabama

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $14.78

State minimum wage: None

Getty Images | Kevin C. Cox

Alaska

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $24.16

State minimum wage: $9.80

Getty Images | Lance King

Arizona

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $17.56

State minimum wage: $10

Getty Images | Stuart Franklin

Arkansas

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $13.72

State minimum wage: $8.50

Getty Images | Brian Bahr

California

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $30.92

State minimum wage: $10 or $10.50, depending on size of company

Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

Colorado

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $21.97

State minimum wage: $9.30

Getty Images | Doug Pensinger

Connecticut

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $24.72

State minimum wage: $10.10

Getty Images | Spencer Platt

Delaware

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $21.62

State minimum wage: $8.25

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Lighthouse along the Delaware seashore.

District of Columbia

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $33.58

State minimum wage: $12.50

Getty Images | Alex Wong

Florida

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $20.68

State minimum wage: $8.15

Getty Images | Handout

Georgia

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $16.79

State minimum wage: $5.15

Getty Images | Scott Cunningham

Hawaii

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $35.20

State minimum wage: $9.25

Getty Images | Kevork Djansezian

Idaho

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $14.65

State minimum wage: $7.25

Getty Images | Jeff T. Green

RELATED: This Map Shows The Largest Company In Each State

Illinois

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $20.87

State minimum wage: $8.25

Getty Images | Scott Olson

Indiana

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $15.17

State minimum wage: $7.25

Getty Images | Chris Graythen

Iowa

Hourly wage needed for a two-bedroom apartment: $14.57

State minimum wage: $7.25

Getty Images | Scott Olson

About the Author

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Brittany Anas

Hi, I'm Brittany Anas (pronounced like the spice, anise ... see, that wasn't too embarrassing to say, now was it?) My professional writing career started when I was in elementary school and my grandma paid me $1 for each story I wrote for her. I'm a former newspaper reporter, with more than a decade of experience Hula-hooping at planning meetings and covering just about every beat from higher-education to crime to science for the Boulder Daily Camera and The Denver Post. Now, I'm a freelance writer, specializing in travel, health, food and adventure. I've contributed to publications including Men's Journal, Forbes, Women's Health, American Way, TripSavvy, Eat This, Not That!, Apartment Therapy, Denver Life Magazine, 5280, Livability, The Denver Post, Simplemost, USA Today Travel Tips, Make it Better, AAA publications, Reader's Digest, Discover Life and more. Learn More.