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The Best Traditional Bath Sink - 2021

Last updated on June 14, 2021
Best Traditional Bath Sink

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Our Picks For The Top Traditional Bath Sinks

Show Contents
Our Take
  Our Top Pick

KOHLER K-2196-4-0 Pennington Self-Rimming Traditional Bath Sink

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval

KOHLER

K-2196-4-0 Pennington Self-Rimming Traditional Bath Sink

Overall Take

Round DesignIf you're looking for a round sink, this classic white drop-in option is a great choice.

  Runner Up

MR Direct U1611-W Undermount Traditional Porcelain Bath Sink

MR Direct

U1611-W Undermount Traditional Porcelain Bath Sink

Overall Take

Extra DurableMade from vitreous china, the surface of this porcelain sink is triple-glazed and triple-fired to help it resist the stains and chips.

  We Also Like

Nantucket Sinks UM-16×11-W No-Rimming Traditional Bath Sink

Nantucket Sinks

UM-16x11-W No-Rimming Traditional Bath Sink

Overall Take

Multipack SetsMulti-sink bathrooms need matching sinks, and this classic white sink is sold in packs from one to five.

  Strong Contender

U-Eway Rectangle Drop-In Traditional Bath Sink, 24-Inch

U-Eway

Rectangle Drop-In Traditional Bath Sink, 24-Inch

Overall Take

Unique Shallow DesignIf you're looking for a shallower basin, this unique-looking sink is the perfect pick.

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Guide written by Stephanie Faris
Last updated on June 14, 2021

Buying a bathroom sink has become more complicated than it was in the past. There are so many different sizes and styles, including some that rest atop your counter like a giant bowl. If your home came with sinks already built in, you might not even think about sink design until someday you need to replace it. Then it’s time to start measuring.

As much as you like that round or rectangular basin, the truth is, you’ll likely have to go with one that fits the cutout in your countertop unless you want to do some construction work. That means simply measuring the countertop and the space available for your sink. You’ll also have to measure the clearance between the edge of the countertop and the backsplash to make sure you’ll have plenty of space for your sink to fit.

From there, it’s a matter of deciding on the type of installation. Drop-in sinks, as the name implies, simply drop into the cutout, usually with the rim hanging over the edge of the cutout a little. These are the easiest to install since you only have to slide the basin through the cutout, mount it and attach the water connections beneath. There are also undermount sinks that you attach beneath the countertop. These are slightly more complicated to install, but they do have an attractive look.

The Best Traditional Bath Sinks

1
  Our Top Pick

KOHLER K-2196-4-0 Pennington Self-Rimming Traditional Bath Sink

With 4-inch center-set faucet holes, this drop-in sink is a great fit for most standard bathroom counters. Made from vitreous china, this sink is built to be durable, although you'll need to avoid using harsh brush bristles or scouring pads to clean it. It's lightweight enough for one person to install it, and the drop-in design makes it even easier to install.

Features


Specifications

Brand
KOHLER
Model
2
  Runner Up

MR Direct U1611-W Undermount Traditional Porcelain Bath Sink

This classic rectangular sink is designed to be installed from beneath the sink to preserve the look of your countertops. The deep, arched interior provides an overflow that helps the sink drain quickly. It comes with a pop-up drain in your choice of three colors: antique bronze, brushed nickel or chrome.

Features


Specifications

Brand
MR Direct
Model
3
  We Also Like

Nantucket Sinks UM-16×11-W No-Rimming Traditional Bath Sink

This ceramic sink is designed for cabinet bases of at least 21 inches. The exterior measures 18 by 12.875 inches, while the interior measures 16 by 10.875, with a bowl depth of 5.875 to 7.375 inches. It includes a built-in overflow to ensure water empties quickly even when it's full.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Nantucket Sinks
Model
4
  Strong Contender

U-Eway Rectangle Drop-In Traditional Bath Sink, 24-Inch

With a modern but simple design that will go with any decor, this porcelain sink will be a great addition to your bathroom. Installation is simple. You'll bolt it on and finish by connecting the included water hoses. You'll also get a chrome pop-up drain that will be a great match for your chrome faucet.

Features


Specifications

Brand
U-Eway
Model
5
  Also Great

Aquaterior Semi Recessed Traditional Bath Sink, 23-Inch

This glazed ceramic basin has a glossy surface to provide extra durability and make it easy to keep clean. It measures 23 by 18 inches and fits most standard countertop designs. It has three faucet holes and an upgraded leak-resistant drain design.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Aquaterior
Model

Our Traditional Bath Sink Buying Guide

Buying a bathroom sink has become more complicated than it was in the past. There are so many different sizes and styles, including some that rest atop your counter like a giant bowl. If your home came with sinks already built in, you might not even think about sink design until someday you need to replace it. Then it’s time to start measuring.

As much as you like that round or rectangular basin, the truth is, you’ll likely have to go with one that fits the cutout in your countertop unless you want to do some construction work. That means simply measuring the countertop and the space available for your sink. You’ll also have to measure the clearance between the edge of the countertop and the backsplash to make sure you’ll have plenty of space for your sink to fit.

From there, it’s a matter of deciding on the type of installation. Drop-in sinks, as the name implies, simply drop into the cutout, usually with the rim hanging over the edge of the cutout a little. These are the easiest to install since you only have to slide the basin through the cutout, mount it and attach the water connections beneath. There are also undermount sinks that you attach beneath the countertop. These are slightly more complicated to install, but they do have an attractive look.

DWYM Fun Fact

If you’ve seen modern bathroom sinks with the basin on top of the counter, you might not realize that vanities got their start this way. Before indoor plumbing was available, many households used a vanity table with a basin on top. This vanity was in the main bedroom of the house rather than the bathroom. The basin was filled with water to allow household members to wash their hands and faces both at night and in the morning. After indoor plumbing became widely available, it became a bathroom fixture rather than something that was set up in the bedroom.

The Traditional Bath Sink Tips and Advice

  • As durable as porcelain can be, take care when cleaning. Scouring pads and rougher brushes can scratch the surface. Instead, use a soft cloth and non-abrasive cleansers.
  • Some bathrooms have two sinks, which means you’ll need to buy matching basins and faucets for each.
  • Look at the installation process. Some sinks are heavier than others, which means you may need a second pair of hands to help you get it into place.
  • Shapes can vary with sinks. Some are round, while others are rectangular. If you’re constructing your countertop from scratch, look at this before you build because you’ll need to ensure your countertop is compatible with the sink shape you’ve chosen.
  • Although porcelain is fairly durable, some sinks feature additional glazing to help protect against stains and chips.
  • Many modern sinks are built with overflow protection built in. This is a small opening in the drain that promotes flow in the drain while the sink is full. With overflow in place, when you release the drain plug to empty the sink, the water flows out more quickly.
  • If your sink comes with a pop-up drain, make sure the design of the drain matches your faucets, as well as the rest of your bathroom décor.

About The Author

Avatar
Stephanie Faris 

Stephanie Faris is a novelist and professional writer. She lives in a beautiful one-acre home in the suburbs on the outskirts of Nashville. Her home and garden work has appeared on popular home sites. She's a true homebody and loves looking at new houses for sale for inspiration on her own home remodeling projects.