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The Best Kids’ Tent - 2022

Last updated on January 6, 2022
Best Kids' Tent

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Our Picks For The Top Kids' Tents

Show Contents
Our Take
  Top Pick

W&O Jungle Animals Themed Kids’ Tent

Don't Waste Your Money Seal of Approval

W&O

Jungle Animals Themed Kids' Tent

Overall Take

Immersive and RoomyThis spacious tent includes a button for animal sound effects.

  Runner Up

Monobeach Battery Powered Star Lights Princess Castle Kids’ Tent

Monobeach

Battery Powered Star Lights Princess Castle Kids' Tent

Overall Take

Magical LightsInterior lights make this pink palace look truly magical.

  We Also Like

Tiny Land String Lights & Padded Matt Kids’ Tent

Tiny Land

String Lights & Padded Matt Kids' Tent

Overall Take

Sturdy Cotton CoveringKids will have a blast in this cozy, durable teepee.

  Strong Contender

FoxPrint Rocket Spaceship & Stars Pop-Up Kids’ Tent

FoxPrint

Rocket Spaceship & Stars Pop-Up Kids' Tent

Overall Take

Inspired DesignKids will have plenty of room to move about this space capsule.

Guide written by Tod Caviness
Last updated on January 6, 2022

Watching your children play all day can be exhausting, and can even make you a little envious. But even with the carefree life they lead, every kid feels the need to get away for some alone time once in awhile. When that time comes, there’s nothing like a good play tent.

In fact, it’s natural and even therapeutic for kids of a certain age to create personal spaces for themselves. If they don’t have a tent readymade at home, they’ll often create one, as any parent with couch cushions knows. These private, cozy areas give them an extra sense of security when things are uncertain. Kids feel in control when they step into a play tent, and it can be fun to see what they do with their own personal kingdom.

If you want to foster that kind of creativity and independence, save your couch cushions and get yourself a tent that your kids can put up whenever they need some “me” time. Of course, the first question you need to ask yourself is whether you’re looking for a play tent or a “real” tent. When kids get older, they may actually want a portable camping tent that can stand up to a full night under the stars and elements. That requires a whole other set of considerations, but for this guide we’ll focus on playtime structures that kids can set up for a short romp in their bedroom or backyard.

Size-wise, let the tent fit the kid. Something too big might be unwieldy for a single child to set up by themselves, and they may lose interest if that process takes too long. If you’re buying for multiple kids of a similar age, go for that extra space — they’ll need it. Otherwise, there’s a lot to be said for keeping things cozy.

These days, you can find tents in three basic structures: teepees, domes and canopies. The teepee is a classic design, inspired by the actual tipi dwellings that were used by early Native Americans of the Great Plains. It’s a one-piece tent that consists of a piece of canvas stretched across three or four poles. Setting it up couldn’t be easier: Just separate the poles and you’ve got a tent.

This simple operation makes the teepee ideal for kids without a lot of patience, and it’s relatively easy to stow under a bed or in a closet corner. The poles tend to be thicker and more durable too, especially on the more authentic teepees with wood construction. These type of tents are safe for most ages, though you may want to watch that very small tots don’t get their fingers pinched between the poles. When fully assembled, teepees also tend to be small and cozy, which fits only children to a T.

If you want a little more structure and space, go for a dome tent. The basic construction is fabric stitched or glued onto a framework of fiberglass or plastic. This framework is usually a lot less durable than wooden teepee poles, and in cheaper tents you might have to assemble it yourself. Decent ones, though, will pop into place easily and some can even fold up. That means that your kid can take it on playdates or into whatever room they want.

The shape might not be a dome per se: You can find dome tents that resemble spaceships, jungle huts or superhero headquarters. This gives them a lot of appeal for imaginative kids. They can also be a lot roomier than teepees, so this is the tent of choice if your kid is expecting multiple visitors.

Canopy tents usually have the same basic structure as a dome tent, but the setup is much more open. Think of a four-poster bed with the curtains coming down on each corner. This might not be great for kids who want more privacy, but they’re great if your toddler wants to hold a fancy tea party.

The Best Kids' Tents

1
  Top Pick

W&O Jungle Animals Themed Kids’ Tent

This durable tent will hit all the marks for animal lovers. Not only are there colorful jungle creatures displayed on all the walls, a "roar" button will make it sound like they're right outside. Setup is easy for adults and even most kids, and the interior has plenty of room.

Features


Specifications

Brand
W&O
Model
2
  Runner Up

Monobeach Battery Powered Star Lights Princess Castle Kids’ Tent

While it's not completely enclosed, this canopy tent does have one big, literal highlight. Little campers can control lights that provide a magical glow to the roomy interior. The poles take a bit longer to set up, but the assembly is a snap.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Monobeach
Model
3
  We Also Like

Tiny Land String Lights & Padded Matt Kids’ Tent

It doesn't get much easier to assemble than this authentic canvas tepee. The poles are thick and durable, as is the cotton material that's on the outer walls and floor. Strings hold open the flap when needed, and it simply folds up when playtime is done.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Tiny Land
Model
4
  Strong Contender

FoxPrint Rocket Spaceship & Stars Pop-Up Kids’ Tent

It will take parents just a few minutes to set the tentpoles up for this pretend spaceship. Once they do, kids will find it's big enough to fit plenty of toys and even a couple friends. The structure is solid enough for indoor or outdoor play.

Features


Specifications

Brand
FoxPrint
Model
5
  Also Great

Swehouse Roll-Up Door & Windows Clubhouse Themed Kids’ Tent

This roomy playhouse comes with a carry bag so that you can tote it along on play dates. Assembly takes just a few minutes thanks to the clever design. The PVC pipes are a breeze to put up and can withstand a fair amount of rough play.

Features


Specifications

Brand
Swehouse
Model

Our Kids' Tent Buying Guide

Watching your children play all day can be exhausting, and can even make you a little envious. But even with the carefree life they lead, every kid feels the need to get away for some alone time once in awhile. When that time comes, there’s nothing like a good play tent.

In fact, it’s natural and even therapeutic for kids of a certain age to create personal spaces for themselves. If they don’t have a tent readymade at home, they’ll often create one, as any parent with couch cushions knows. These private, cozy areas give them an extra sense of security when things are uncertain. Kids feel in control when they step into a play tent, and it can be fun to see what they do with their own personal kingdom.

If you want to foster that kind of creativity and independence, save your couch cushions and get yourself a tent that your kids can put up whenever they need some “me” time. Of course, the first question you need to ask yourself is whether you’re looking for a play tent or a “real” tent. When kids get older, they may actually want a portable camping tent that can stand up to a full night under the stars and elements. That requires a whole other set of considerations, but for this guide we’ll focus on playtime structures that kids can set up for a short romp in their bedroom or backyard.

Size-wise, let the tent fit the kid. Something too big might be unwieldy for a single child to set up by themselves, and they may lose interest if that process takes too long. If you’re buying for multiple kids of a similar age, go for that extra space — they’ll need it. Otherwise, there’s a lot to be said for keeping things cozy.

These days, you can find tents in three basic structures: teepees, domes and canopies. The teepee is a classic design, inspired by the actual tipi dwellings that were used by early Native Americans of the Great Plains. It’s a one-piece tent that consists of a piece of canvas stretched across three or four poles. Setting it up couldn’t be easier: Just separate the poles and you’ve got a tent.

This simple operation makes the teepee ideal for kids without a lot of patience, and it’s relatively easy to stow under a bed or in a closet corner. The poles tend to be thicker and more durable too, especially on the more authentic teepees with wood construction. These type of tents are safe for most ages, though you may want to watch that very small tots don’t get their fingers pinched between the poles. When fully assembled, teepees also tend to be small and cozy, which fits only children to a T.

If you want a little more structure and space, go for a dome tent. The basic construction is fabric stitched or glued onto a framework of fiberglass or plastic. This framework is usually a lot less durable than wooden teepee poles, and in cheaper tents you might have to assemble it yourself. Decent ones, though, will pop into place easily and some can even fold up. That means that your kid can take it on playdates or into whatever room they want.

The shape might not be a dome per se: You can find dome tents that resemble spaceships, jungle huts or superhero headquarters. This gives them a lot of appeal for imaginative kids. They can also be a lot roomier than teepees, so this is the tent of choice if your kid is expecting multiple visitors.

Canopy tents usually have the same basic structure as a dome tent, but the setup is much more open. Think of a four-poster bed with the curtains coming down on each corner. This might not be great for kids who want more privacy, but they’re great if your toddler wants to hold a fancy tea party.

DWYM Fun Fact

Kids’ teepees are known for their easy setup, and that’s exactly why the Native Americans used them, too. The original tipis of the Lakota might be larger structures that could accommodate entire families, but they could also be assembled within 30 minutes. That was a must for the nomadic lifestyles of early tribes.

The Kids' Tent Tips and Advice

Typically, kids don’t need any decorating tips when it comes to their tent. Set it up, and you can count on your child to stock up the fort with dolls, pillows and whatever toy supplies they need to get them through playtime. But if you do want to make the space a little more special, try a string of lights. This is only recommended for sturdy tents, but when properly done it can make the interior truly magical.


About The Author

Tod Caviness 

Tod Caviness is a professional writer and journalist for the past 20 years. More importantly, he is the father of a 7-year-old boy and an 2-year-old girl, and enjoys curating a library of books for them both. He figures his "dad tour of duty" will be done when they can both beat him at Settlers of Catan.